Best Kept Secret….

Why singing in a good choir should be your New Year resolution!

Even if you’re reading this after 1st January, it’s still not too late to make 2018 the year you unlock your potential as a singer and have more fun than going to the gym or giving up beer, chips, or chocolate!

Singing in a choir is one of life’s best-kept secrets.  Here are seven reasons why you should give it a try:

No.1.   It’s Fun!

Like anything that is worth doing, it does require some effort, but the undeniable truth about singing is that it is fun.   Lots of people sing when they are happy, but guess what? It works the other way round too: singing makes you happy!  There’s some science behind it too, because studies have shown that singing in a group releases endorphins (which are the body’s natural ‘highs’).   There’s also plenty of evidence from those who regularly sing in a choir.  During rehearsal they concentrate on singing and, at least for a while, all the troubles and pressures of everyday life are left behind.   Many choristers leave rehearsals feeling happy and satisfied.  And quite a few go directly to the pub for a drink with fellow choristers afterwards!

No.2.   It’s really good for your health.

Singing improves circulation and is great for your heart, lungs, and brain function: it improves your memory and strengthens your mental health too.  It can also benefit your posture and may help you get a better night’s sleep: in some people, it has also helped to reduce snoring.  You might think these are pretty outrageous claims, but there is an ever-growing body of evidence which proves them to be true.  For example a Frankfurt University Study found that “Choir singing positively influences both emotional affect and immune competence.”  But don’t take my word for it: there are links to a number of great articles at the bottom of the page, which should give you all the evidence you need!

NeuroscienceSingingFeature

Graphic courtesy of Uplift Connect (see their article on the Neuroscience of Singing)

No.3.   It improves your social life. Singing in a good choir is a great way of making new friends.  In a choir like the Wessex Male Choir, there are choristers of all ages and backgrounds.  The Wessex also prides itself on being a very friendly and supportive choir who sing to a high standard yet still enjoy a drink or two and some informal singing in the pub after rehearsals or concerts!  The guys are a fun bunch of folk who take their singing seriously, but themselves less so.   In any choir, you become part of a large family – in fact several former rugby players have described belonging to the choir as being a bit like belonging to a rugby club but without the rugby and the injuries!

No. 4.   It helps you to develop new skills.

If you haven’t sung before, then before you know it, you’ll be developing new skills as well as new friends.   Even if you don’t read music, very soon, at least some of it will make more sense.  The Wessex Male Choir has a chorister development programme and a ‘buddy’ system that helps you to develop your singing skills.   The Wessex also has a range of excellent online learning aids available for members for all of the songs we sing. The more you sing, the more you begin to appreciate good choral music and good singers.   You become more knowledgeable about singing in general!

IMG_2068

Members of the Wessex Male Choir enjoying a recent rehearsal.

No.5.   It improves your confidence.

Joining a choir, and eventually going on to perform as part of the group in front of a live audience, really helps build self-confidence.   You don’t have to do solos if you don’t want to, and you will only be put on stage when you’re ready, so there’s no chance of making a fool of yourself.

No.6.   It is a great way of supporting charities.

Every year, choirs like the Wessex perform at concerts in support of great national and local causes.  In October alone, we raised over £3000 for charitable causes.   Some choristers are even participating in the London Half Marathon in March (fast walking and stopping to sing to the crowds on the way around) whilst at the same time raising money for Parkinson’s UK.

No.7.   It gives you a real sense of achievement.

Once you’ve learnt the songs and sung in a concert, you get the most amazing sense of achievement.   It’s no accident that after most concerts, members of the Wessex Male Choir (like many other choirs)  have something called an ‘Afterglow’ – an often impromptu party in a local hostelry where there’s yet more singing and sampling of ale!  You really do get a wonderful feeling of satisfaction after a good concert.  And when you get to the end of 2018 and look back at what you have achieved, I can guarantee that if you joined a choir during the year, then singing will be one of the highlights of the year…every year from now on!

How to Get Involved

For men, the Wessex Male Choir has got an open-rehearsal on Tuesday 16th January from 7.30pm-9.30pm at our rehearsal venue at the Church of Christ the Servant, Abbey Meads, Swindon, SN25 4YX (Map).  The repertoire is very varied: everything from rock and pop anthems to music theatre, opera choruses, traditional songs and well-known choral pieces.  There’s plenty of free parking outside, and if you fancy a pint afterwards, the pub is right next door!  You will be assured of a very warm welcome whatever your age or experience, so why not come along and see what it’s like?  There’s no obligation, and the evening is free!

The Wessex Male Choir is also planning a day-long singing workshop on Saturday 28thApril from 9.30am-4.30pm, also at Abbey Meads, with the inspirational choral director, Mark Burstow.  Again there’s no charge for the day, and as places are limited, e-mail the Choir early at Wessexmalechoir@gmail.com to reserve a place!

The Wessex standard of singing is high (we are one of the UK’s premier male choirs!) so if that isn’t for you, then there are plenty of community singing groups and other choirs in Swindon.   And if you already sing in a community singing group, you can always join the Wessex as well for a bit of variety (quite a few of our choristers sing with other groups as well – the two are not mutually exclusive!)

Articles about the benefits of singing in a choir.

Does Singing Make You Happy? https://science.howstuffworks.com/life/inside-the-mind/emotions/singing-happy.htm

Singing Changes Your Brain (Group singing has been scientifically proven to lower stress, relieve anxiety, and elevate endorphins) http://ideas.time.com/2013/08/16/singing-changes-your-brain/

Community Singing ‘improves mental health and helps recovery’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-42431430

Can Singing in a Choir Make Me Healthier?  http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zcc7tyc

The Effects of Choir Singing… on Immunoglobulin A, Cortisol, and Emotional State. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15669447

11 Surprising Health Benefits of Singing https://takelessons.com/blog/health-benefits-of-singing

The Neuroscience of Singing (The neuroscience of singing shows that when we sing our neurotransmitters connect in new and different ways. It fires up the right temporal lobe of our brain, releasing endorphins that make us smarter, healthier, happier and more creative. When we sing with other people this effect is amplified.) http://upliftconnect.com/neuroscience-of-singing/

GE

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

 

Advertisements

Male Choirs: A dying breed or an exciting opportunity?

Even in the Welsh heartlands, that bastion of male choral singing, choirs are struggling to recruit new singers and inevitably, some will simply fade away into silence, taking with them a once proud tradition of community spirit and male singing.   Their failure to evolve into something attractive to a new generation of singers seals their fate, but it doesn’t have to be this way.

The stereotypical image of old men in blazers singing traditional Welsh hymn tunes is one that many men’s choirs, including the Swindon-based Wessex Male Choir, are working hard to dispel, but like all deeply-embedded stereotypes, it is proving difficult to shake off, and even innovative choirs have to tread a fine line between alienating audiences that love the traditional songs, and attracting new audiences and singers who want something more contemporary.

Informal WMC Hi Res

‘The Men in Black’ – Wessex Male Choir & Music Director Rhiannon Williams

So how do male choirs fight back and ensure that they remain relevant to today’s audiences and singers? There are plenty of articles in the press about the demise of male choirs, but considerably fewer offering suggestions for how the genre could evolve and develop. Science hasn’t yet reached the point where we can clone Gareth Malone, (and maybe that’s a good thing), so there’s no easy answer: if there were, then every male choir would be thriving.   However, it’s fair to say there are some emerging trends among successful choirs that may point the way.   Arguably, it is also true that choirs that are successful in attracting new audiences, are also successful in attracting new choristers: the two go hand-in-hand.

Butlin’s Bluecoats or an Undertakers’ Convention?

The first problem is the look. As smart as it may be, for many people, a choir dressed in blazers seems very old fashioned. But what to replace it with is equally challenging. For many years, Wessex choristers have worn black trousers and open-necked long-sleeved black shirts when performing (although sometimes we wear DJs and red bow ties – or a garish selection of Christmas pullovers). But even the black shirts are now commonplace and maybe rather passé.   Various choirs have experimented with different coloured shirts, different ties, bow ties, waistcoasts, jackets, and altogether more informal styles such as rugby shirts, ‘working clothes’ and even pirate costumes. The jury is out as to which works best because there are still occasions that call for a more formal look. I remember on one occasion when we tried our black shirts with bow ties we looked like an undertakers’ convention! And trying to look ‘cool’ if you have a Zimmer frame or a beer belly is also tricky, but somehow choirs have to find a cost-effective style that works and doesn’t send younger audiences and singers running for the hills.

Wesley’s Greatest Hits

The second problem is repertoire. I don’t think any male choirs want to completely turn their backs on the wealth of wonderful tunes represented by the traditional male voice choir genre, but if we are to attract younger audiences there has to be a desire to innovate and try new stuff including pop and rock arrangements, and choral works by modern composers. Getting the balance right can be difficult, and selecting the right material is also hard with most choirs having to indulge in a costly bit of trial and error to find songs that really work. Whilst there are some good arrangers out there, there is also a shortage of great arrangements of modern pieces for TTBB (tenor/tenor/baritone/bass) choirs, and quite often, the cost of obtaining the rights to arrange a great pop song, rock anthem or music theatre piece can be prohibitive.   I know from personal experience that trying to secure arrangement permissions from companies like Disney, who own the rights to a huge number of very popular songs, can be too costly to contemplate.   The Wessex Male Choir strongly encourages our choristers and our audiences to suggest songs they would like us to sing.   This can be a double-edged sword at times because it can create expectations that are difficult or impossible to deliver.   To ‘manage’ all the suggestions, we have a repertoire advisory team (RAT) that supports the Music Director in finding new pieces. A lot of the suggestions received by the RAT are simply not viable because of copyright or performing rights issues; because there are no suitable arrangements available; or simply because the style of piece relies too much on other voices (e.g. sopranos) or long instrumental riffs for guitar and drums that sound pants when played on a piano! It’s early days for our RAT, but with the encouragement of our Music Director, we are already building a sizeable chunk of enjoyable new repertoire that is quite different to most other choirs: but we still have a long way to go!

A Bunch of Stiffs

The third problem is the challenge of being ‘entertaining’. Serried ranks of choristers standing rigidly to attention on stage is a real turn-off for everyone except retired sergeant-majors (who are strange people anyway). Choirs need movement to help them express the joy and energy of the songs they sing, and just as dynamic contrast can deliver spine-tingling moments, so too can stillness when contrasted with movement. Choralography (the art of putting choreographed moves together with choral music) needs careful handling if it isn’t to look silly or detract from the music. The music has to come first. Choralography needs to be slick, polished, and rehearsed to perfection if it is to work. And if your choir is populated by 70-year olds, the moves might be quite limited (e.g. no splits, pirouhettes, or balletic grand jetés!). Other forms of stagecraft can also help make the performance more interesting: use flags, torches, umbrellas, hats, false beards; stand in a different formation, move about while singing, hang the second tenors upside down from the ceiling (please)…anything but be more imaginative than just standing on parade and your audience will love you for it.

The disappointing news is that when you’ve done all this successfully, there’s still no guarantee that you’ll attract younger audiences or younger choristers. The trouble is, there are just too many other distractions for them. So how do you make singing so ‘cool’ that they will choose singing over other options? I’m not sure, but here are a few recruiting ideas to consider.

Recruiting.

At present, we still get most of our new recruits via existing choristers.   Your members are your best advert and they need to advocate vigorously on behalf of the choir. Get them talking about the choir to men at work, in the pub, in the club and at the game – and anywhere else! Their enthusiasm is the biggest selling point you have, and make sure they are well supported with a plentiful supply of attractive business cards, flyers and other recruiting literature.   Gone are the days when you could just put on an ‘open evening’ and expect men to flock in. As Einstein said, “the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results”, so be bold, try new things to attract new choristers.

Last year, the Wessex Male Choir ran a very successful recruiting campaign called Project RMS (Real Men Sing), which included singing at Wembley in front of 85,000 people, visiting a local military base (examining the hardware and singing in one of the messes), a flash-mob, getting broadcast on local radio, and singing in a concert – all without any obligation to join the choir!

Screen Shot 2017-12-01 at 13.46.34 copy

Part of the Wessex Male Choir’s ‘Project RMS’ recruiting trifold from last year.

Even better is to give men a reason to sing, rather than expect them to admit they rather fancy the idea! Get them singing to raise money for charity. Just think how many outrageously hideous moustaches you’ve seen in Movember? Perfectly nice, rational men who for the rest of the year look almost respectable suddenly turn into hairy slug-balancers and sprout the most ridiculous 1970’s porn-star moustaches…in the name of charity! Joining a choir (even temporarily) to sing in a charity fundraiser is the excuse that men might need, and it’s nowhere near as bad as having to grow dodgy-looking face furniture.

Use social media as much as possible. Write a blog. Create memes for Facebook and Twitter. Get people talking about your choir! Consider using targeted advertising on Facebook where you pay to ‘boost’ a post to a specific demographic. For example, for recruiting, you might want to target 30-60 year old men with an interest in concerts and singing who live within 20 miles of where you are based. Facebook should then serve up your post into their Facebook ‘feed’ and hopefully, you’ll get your message across.

Untitled

An example of some recent Wessex Male Choir memes for Facebook and Twitter.

Get collaborating – especially with youth choirs. Not only do they generally drag their proud parents along to hear them sing, but as they transition from a youth choir into something more adult, if they have seen you perform and maybe shared the stage with you, there’s a good chance they’ll consider joining you.   But please, don’t be a ‘vampire’!

Old Vampires and Young Blood!

How many times have you heard old choirs talking about needing young blood? I hate the term – it makes us sound like a bunch of desperate old vampires! And that brings me onto a related topic: all too often, the existing members see the need for new members but don’t want them to ‘rock-the-boat’: in other words, some older members can be very resistant to change. The choir has to belong to the new members too – so do what you can to empower them.   Seek their views on everything from stagecraft to repertoire, and dress code. You need them more than they need you.

Recruiting from Colleges and Schools

Recruiting from schools and colleges may seem like an obvious approach for finding younger singers but it can be hard work getting the right access and finding the right event format. The offer of running a singing workshop, or performing at a school assembly may seem good to us, but to a busy school with a jam-packed curriculum, it may not be met with quite such enthusiasm. Getting the lads to sing in front of their mates is also likely to be tricky unless you have got something really interesting to offer them. In my experience, this recruiting path seldom delivers, but when it does, it can build a core of younger singers that will help to attract more.   (Don’t forget to use your younger singers in your publicity photos!) Having a youth choir is perhaps the best way of getting younger men interested in singing, but very few choirs have the resources to be able to offer this unless working in collaboration with a school or the local music hub. Sadly, even when you’ve enjoyed some success in recruiting younger choristers, the investment can often be negated by the pull of university and all manner of other attractions, but this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try.

OBA

The success of groups such as Only Boys Aloud shows that boys can be encouraged into singing!

Retaining all your new recruits can be a challenge: even following our very successful Project RMS, we struggled to retain some of the newbies. The Wessex is an auditioned choir with high standards and that requires a lot of time and effort from our choristers, so inevitably, some of our new recruits reluctantly felt that they couldn’t commit.   We try to make it as easy as possible though: we have a buddying system to help new recruits; there is no shortage of support, encouragement and advice from section leaders and other choristers, and we have a first-rate set of online resources for helping people to learn the songs. For example, every rehearsal is recorded, just in case you want to go over something again! Lastly, having a chorister development programme helps to build confidence and attract singers as well as improving the overall standard of the singing. It is something that no good choir should be without.

I hope this article has given you some ideas about how male choirs might tackle some of the common problems we all share. We would love to hear your ideas too. Let’s grasp this exciting opportunity to transform the genre! The alternative is unthinkable.

Guy Edwards


Some articles about the challenges facing male choirs.

Welsh male voice choirs struggle to attract young (BBC 2012) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-19173496

Can the male voice choir survive in the modern world? (The Daily Telegraph -2016) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-filter/can-the-male-voice-choir-survive-in-the-modern-world/

Welsh male voice choirs: a vocal minority (The Guardian -2011) https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/feb/01/welsh-choir-only-men-aloud

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

Are you an incompetent singer?

This week’s blog is meant as a challenge to all you singers out there.   You might think it is pretentious twaddle or you may find that it sets you a useful challenge.   Either way, I hope it provokes you to think about your singing and how competent you are as a singer.

Singing standards, audience appreciation, and competition success are all linked.   So whether you sing in an amateur choir or a professional ensemble, your skills as a singer ultimately dictate the success or otherwise of your singing group. That may seem obvious, but there’s far more to it than meets the eye, and it’s all to do with competence.

Back in the 1970s, a chap called Noel Burch described the four stages in learning any new skill and illustrated his ideas by using a ‘Competence Pyramid’.   No wait…don’t leave! I know it sounds like some esoteric management-gobbledygook, but it helps to explain a whole lot about how singers get good, how some audiences are more receptive than others, and how competition success can be achieved!

1200px-Competence_Hierarchy_adapted_from_Noel_Burch_by_Igor_Kokcharov.svg copy

Still here? Great. It’s probably easier if I explain the competence pyramid thingy by using a car-driving analogy – but it applies to almost any skill.

The first stage is blissful ignorance (or ‘unconscious incompetence’). For example: you have no idea what the clutch does, how to change gear, or even why you need to.   Then one day, you decide that you want to learn how to drive. Over a period of months, between nervous breakdowns, the driving instructor explains what the gears do, how to do three-point turns, and how to drive away from a junction without doing multiple ‘kangaroo’ hops like Skippy the Bush Kangaroo. It will take lots of practice until you can do it all safely, but even if you can’t do it yet, at least you now understand what is needed, and thankfully your driving instructor is on powerful medication.   This is the second stage and is known as ‘conscious incompetence’ because you now realize that you have a lot to learn!

Then the big day arrives: the driving test! Hopefully you pass and you are now officially ‘competent’ at driving a car (meaning that you have learnt all the basic skills required).   But there are some things you still have to work hard at: you probably need to concentrate when doing a three-point turn or parallel-parking.   To start with, you still have to think very carefully about how to drive your car, even if you have passed the test without squashing any pedestrians.   This is the third stage and it’s known as ‘conscious competence’.   You can do it safely and competently, but you’re no ninja and it still requires conscious effort.

After a number of years, most drivers happily drive their cars around fairly safely and seldom have to consciously think about how to do it. They can even do parallel-parking without mounting the kerb or backing into a lamp-post while still talking to their passenger and listening to the radio at the same time. In other words, driving has become almost automatic. This is the final stage of learning a new skill, and it’s called ‘unconscious competence’.

So what? How does that map across to singing? Well as a complete novice, you may not realize how difficult it is to sing well. You don’t know what you don’t know. You hear people singing all time on the telly and radio, and it all seems pretty effortless. So you decide to give it a try and you join a choir. The musical director keeps wittering on about breathing, support, diction, timing, dynamic control, blending, tonality, phrasing, and loads of other things. Suddenly, you realize that there’s more to this singing malarkey than meets the eye, and you transition from ‘unconscious incompetence’ into ‘conscious incompetence’. You realize how little you really know – but at least help is on hand to get you through the tricky bits!

You start to improve, but when you concentrate on perfecting your diction, maybe your phrasing suffers or your ‘support’ is lacking.   Doing everything that is required all at once is really hard and takes years of training until it all becomes second nature. Professional singers often spend years taking singing lessons before studying vocal performance for three years at college – and often then going on to post-graduate degrees in performance studies. But even after all that, most would agree that they are still learning.   In fact only a select few professional singers ever truly achieve the ‘unconscious competence’ stage!

Regular practice and singing lessons is the only way you will ever move from incompetence to competence.

Book

Members of the Wessex Male Choir appear in David Howard’s excellent book on Choral Singing.  (This book would make someone a great Christmas present! Details at end of article).

Learning the techniques that make you a better singer is all well and good, and it might be tempting to approach singing very technically (e.g. making sure your larynx is in the right place, using diaphragmatic breathing, and learning how to mix chest and head voice etc.) but unless it is well-practiced and automatic, it will distract you from your main job on stage which is that of communicating with the audience: you know, those discerning folk who have paid good money to hear you sing. But if you’re standing in front of an audience worrying about your breathing (or where you left your larynx), then you have probably lost whatever rapport you were hoping for! A technically excellent performance can be boring if it lacks rapport, but similarly, an emotionally-connected performance can also be spoilt by poor technique, especially if the audience is even a little bit knowledgeable.

Of course, audiences don’t have to be ‘competent’ in order to enjoy performances, and they certainly don’t have to pass a test before they can go to concerts! But it is clear that some audiences don’t really know the first thing about singing and will quite happily applaud a really mediocre performance. You can often see that in TV talent show audiences where they go crazy just because a singer belts out an ear-splitting top note (however badly) or cunningly evades the melody by warbling around it so much that you forget what they’re meant to be singing. Ignorance really can be bliss! But if you or your choir want to perform in front of knowledgeable or discerning audiences (which might include other singers and other choirs), then you will have master at least some of the technical skills needed. The MD can’t do it all for you. Of course, competition adjudicators tend to know rather a lot about singing and are well placed to recognize whether you, as a singer, have mastered some of the skills needed for a great performance and whether your choir is run-of-the-mill or something rather special.

There’s another good reason for wanting to improve your competence as a singer. Good singing technique helps to preserve your voice, both in the short term, and so that you can enjoy your singing long into the future. Truly great singers like Placido Domingo (now 76 and still singing in world-class opera) attributes much of his longevity as a singer to his constant focus on technique – a focus that continues to this day. I think we’ve all heard choirs performing at major competitions when on ‘Day One’ the sound is beautiful, but by the end of the competition or festival, tired voices are very evident and the sound quality is poor. This is most noticeable in amateur choirs and I know of at least two otherwise very good choirs who have probably missed out on winning a ‘Choir of Choirs’ prize due to lack of individual technique – or possibly too many celebratory beers after winning the earlier stages in competitions!

WMC Poppies

The Wessex Male Choir in fine voice.

But how can any choir hope to do well in competition if the choristers don’t understand what the adjudicators are looking for? A quick internet search on choral adjudication turns up a wide range of competencies required for good choral singing. There’s an edited version of one such guide here: What Adjudicators Are Looking For.  It’s clear that the good technique associated with competent singers produces the sort of high quality singing that adjudicators and well-informed audiences cherish.

Even brilliant entertainers can suffer the consequences of poor technique and it can be career-limiting. I suppose the most famous examples are Adele and Julie Andrews, both of whom had wonderful voices but suffered damage to their vocal cords almost certainly as result of their singing technique. Whilst it is less common among classically-trained singers and opera singers (the Olympic athletes of the singing world), it is certainly not unheard of. There was a great article about stars losing their voices in The Guardian in August 2017 by Bernhard Warner. The link is here, and it’s well worth a read!

So this is where it gets personal: where do you think your singing fits into the ‘Competence Pyramid’? Even if you don’t aspire to be a great soloist, surely when you sing in a choir you want to be the best you can be in order to contribute to the overall success of the choir? If so, what steps have you taken to develop as a singer? It doesn’t happen by accident. Do you know how to support your breath properly? What is ‘support’? What is head voice? How often do you work on your diction? How well do you know the words, notes, phrasing, and dynamics of the piece you are singing? If none of these things mean anything to you, then you are still floundering around at the ‘unconscious incompetence’ stage and the chances are that your choir will never be anything special.

GE

Recommended Resources: 

http://www.vocalist.org.uk/index.html  – a good website for singers with all sorts of technique tips and singing exercises.

Books:

Choral Singing and Healthy Voice Production’ – by David M Howard (complete with the photo of WMC singers on page 106!).   An excellent book that covers just about everything to do with Choral Singing.   Available from Amazon and all good book stores!

‘Find Your Voice’ – by Jo Thompson.   A great all-round singing guide, also available from Amazon and all good book sellers!

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

‘Tis (nearly) the season to be jolly!

Everyone loves Christmas and the Wessex Male Choir is no exception. Christmas trees, lights, presents, old films, presents, chocolates, presents, ugly Christmas jumpers, presents and of course, carols.

Most of us have grown up with fond memories of participating in school nativity plays and singing carols. Now, whilst we no longer get the chance to wear tea towels on our heads or pretend to be donkeys, cows and assorted animals in the manger, we can still sing carols – and occasionally wear silly hats….

Holyrood 2015 (17 of 20)

Let’s be honest, whilst presents are very important, nothing touches the soul like singing. Its ability to move you, to enchant, to captivate and to inspire is a gift like no other. Carols especially evoke the deepest, fondest memories, and if I hear Silent Night sung on Christmas Eve, I still surreptitiously steal a glance at the sky in case I can see Santa’s sleigh.

Christmas is a busy time for us and we eagerly look forward to preparing new concert material – usually beginning in late September. We are a fairly youthful choir, which has its advantages and disadvantages. For example, we are proud to have a blend and tone which is the envy of many of other choirs, allied with an appetite for taking on challenging new arrangements. However, as a young choir, many of us still work and have young families, which means that we are unable to fulfil each of the many requests we receive to perform at Christmas concerts. Our Christmas concerts are therefore relatively exclusive and this year, we are participating in just three events: with the Brize Norton Military Wives Choir at Carterton on the 15 December in aid of SSAFA: our own annual Wessex Christmas concert at the Multi Entertainment Cultural Arena (MECA) in Swindon on Thursday 21st December, and performing a set or two at the Swindon Wildcats game at the Link on the 9th December.

WMC Christmas 2017

Our festive repertoire for this year embraces sacred, traditional, and even Jewish pieces, so there is something for everyone! We have a blend of new pieces, and some old favourites, so if you want to listen to some beautiful new music and sing along with us too, our Christmas concerts are the place to be. Our course, there will be the opportunity to sing along to some of your favourite carols too.

Our concert programme includes:

The Gloucestershire Wassail (also known as the Cricklade Wassail), which has been specially arranged for the Choir by one of our choristers – Guy Edwards: Guy’s arrangement celebrates the traditional & cheerful Wassail whilst bringing a contemporary element, which will thrill all.

The vivacious “Hanukkah holiday” – a guaranteed crowd pleaser, accompanied by some lively “choralography:” Don’t forget your dreidels!

A rarely heard version of The First Noel which combines the traditional carol tune with the baroque favourite, Pachelbel’s Canon in D. This clever arrangement by Michael Clawson intertwines these two timeless works beautifully. It has been pronounced “a first-rate choral masterpiece, which has rapidly become a classic.” It features a three-hand piano accompaniment, but unless we can find a mutant accompanist; two hands will have to suffice.

We Three Kings was originally written by John Hopkins in 1857. Given its enduring its place in the canon of great tunes, I expect John was Welsh! We though, are singing an arrangement by Andy Beck, which has been described as..: “A dramatic choral introduction precedes a sizzling jazz waltz arranged with fresh contemporary chords, driving rhythmic intensity, and original, school-appropriate lyrics. Enjoy the new “star of wonder” melody, paired with an awesome descending chromatic line, and rejoice in the easy-on-the-voice, impressive-on-the-ears jazzy twists!” Beautiful. And that’s just the description!

And Can it Be is a Christian hymn originally written by Charles Wesley in the early 18th century to celebrate his conversion. The original tune was written in a traditional Methodist style similar to those written by his elder brother John Wesley. Dan Forrest has arranged a stunning contemporary interpretation of the tune containing subtle quotes from the original.

The Wessex Camerata (our chamber group) will be performing the beautiful Es Ist Ein Rose Entsprungen, a beautiful old German carol, traditionally associated with the start of Christmas and evoking the wonder and hope of Christ’s birth as prophesied by Isaiah.

PUK Christmas 2015 (13 of 16)

The Wessex Camerata will also be singing an arrangement by Ruth Schram of Personent Hodie,  a much-loved Christmas carol originally published in 1582 in the Finnish song book Piae Cantiones.

As Dylan Thomas wrote in from his poem A Child’s Christmas in Wales:

‘One Christmas was so much like another, in those years around the sea-town corner now and out of all sound except the distant speaking of the voices I sometimes hear a moment before sleep, that I can never remember whether it snowed for six days and six nights when I was twelve or whether it snowed for twelve days and twelve nights when I was six.’

If Christmas holds fond memories for you too, come and celebrate them with us.

-DL.

You can order tickets online now from www.ticketsource.co.uk/wessex-male-choir

Do you need money?

Would you like a cheque for £1500? £1800? £2500?

Okay, it’s a daft question, we all need money, but specifically, do you need money for a special cause? Maybe the church roof needs repairing, or you support a major charity or health organization? Maybe you’ve held coffee mornings to fund a playgroup, or completed a sponsored event to raise money for a hospice or local food-bank? Maybe you knit woolly hats for llamas.   Whatever your favourite cause, the chances are it needs fundraisers like you to help it carry out the valuable work it does.  So would you like a cheque for £1500,  £1800, or £2500 for your cause?

WMC at Wembley Poppy Launch 2016Launching last year’s RBL Poppy Appeal at Wembley in front of 80,000 fans

Working with local promoters, our two most recent concerts raised about £1500 (for the Royal British Legion in Cirencester) and £1800 for the Lechlade Village Hall Fund.   At St Mary’s Church in Fairford a few years ago, our concert raised £2500 for the church appeal. So what’s the secret of their success?

The key to the success for such concerts is YOU. We can put on a fantastic show for you, but without YOUR network of contacts, friends, family, and supporters, we cannot generate an audience. The Wessex Male Choir is based in Swindon where we are well known and have an enthusiastic following, but in the towns and villages away from Swindon, we don’t have the same connections, so this is where you, as a local promoter, can make all the difference.   If you have got a good network or a popular cause, then selling enough tickets for a concert to make a handsome profit, should not be a problem.

We have organized countless concerts over the years and we have put together a handy Guide to Promoting a Concert which tells you all you need to know about organizing a successful event – and we offer it free to any potential concert promoter.  (Ask Stuart for a copy concerts@wessexmalechoir.co.uk).   We’re also happy to help out in other ways (for example, we can offer a free poster design service – and we have contacts with very reasonably priced local printers). We can even help you sell tickets online. We have our own staging, amplification, and lighting (if required) so you needn’t worry about any of that.

PUK Christmas 2015 (16 of 16)The Wessex Male Choir at a charity fundraiser for Parkinson’s UK in Southwark RC Cathedral, along with Jenni Murray, Jane Hill, and Jane Asher, and PUK Chief Executive, Steve Ford.

Successful promoters try hard to keep costs to a minimum, and in particular, if you have free use of a good venue, then that’s a huge advantage.   Most churches, schools, and community centres have reasonable hire rates, and may even provide the venue free of charge if the cause is one that is close to their hearts.

The Wessex Male Choir is one of the UK’s leading male choirs and has won numerous national and international singing competitions. We offer a very varied and professional programme. We even have our own chamber group, the Wessex Camerata, that helps us to widen the choice of songs on offer! We aspire to professional standards, but of course excellence comes at a cost: we have professional music staff, only use properly authorized arrangements and copyrighted music, and our ‘on-the-day’ concert management and staging is slick. We have to cover our costs by charging a charity fee, but one that is easily covered by selling just 50 tickets!   The income from another 50 tickets would almost always comfortably cover most venue hire costs and publicity, therefore we reckon anything over 100 tickets sold is pure profit for your cause. So the challenge is this: do you think that you and your network of friends, family, and supporters can sell more than 100 tickets? If the answer is ‘yes’, then you’re onto a winner!   We can help you raise funds for your favourite cause.

WessexMaleChoirWithAledJonesSheffieldThe Wessex with one of our patrons, Aled Jones, at a charity concert.

We occasionally raise funds directly for charitable causes. For example, back in 2007, a sizeable contingent from the Wessex Male Choir took part in the London Marathon to raise funds for the charity, Parkinson’s UK  Our completion time was dreadful, but then again, we kept stopping on the way around to sing to the crowds! We raised £32,000 on the day and, at subsequent events, have taken the total to over £65,000. One of our choristers, Jeff Hannath, who has been a stalwart supporter of the charity, saw that the first London Half Marathon – ‘The Big Half’ – is being held in March 2018, and so a group of us, along with a few former choristers and friends, will be participating once again to raise funds for Parkinson’s UK. Doubtless the temptation to sing to the crowds will be too great to resist!   (If you would like to sponsor us, then please visit our Just Giving page at https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/wessexchoir)

LondonMarathon2007Crazy choristers!  Wessex choristers singing their way around the London Marathon to raise funds for Parkinson’s UK. 

They say that ‘charity begins at home’, and running (no pun intended) a choir as good as the Wessex costs money. We’re an arts charity in our own right, dedicated to spreading the joy of male choral music far and wide, and sometimes we have to raise funds for the Choir so that we can keep on doing the great work with others. Of course we’d love it if an individual or a company offered to sponsor us, or even if someone were to sponsor a concert in aid of their favourite charity. We’re always pleased to collaborate with other entertainers too, and have worked with youth groups such as MJ-UK Music & Arts, celebrity singers such Paul Potts, Hayley Westenra, and Juliette Pochin, and we have sung in front of capacity crowds at Wembley and Twickenham!   Please get in touch with us if you would like details of our sponsorship packages.   Our events diary can fill up quite quickly, so if you’re thinking about hiring the Choir, please don’t delay!

Our own Christmas Concert this year is on Thursday 21st December at the Multi Entertainment & Cultural Arena (MECA) in Regent’s Circus, Swindon.  Tickets cost £12.50 and are on sale online now from www.ticketsource.co.uk/wessex-male-choir.  (Reserved seating is only available to Friends of the Choir, but you can easily become a Friend for free, by sending your name and e-mail address to friends@wessexmalechoir.co.uk  This will add you to our mailing list and you’ll receive about three newsletters a year, be able to reserve seats at our concerts, and take part in occasional online feedback surveys.)

GE

JOIN OUR MAILING LIST

Musical Direction!

In this week’s blog, Dave Langley, one of the Choir’s founding members, talks about the Choir’s three musical directors and the vitally important role they have each played in making the Wessex Male Choir one of the country’s top amateur male choirs. As well as directing our concerts, the musical director selects our repertoire, teaches us singing technique, rehearses us through every song in minute detail, encourages us to give our best in performance, critiques our singing, and helps us to achieve the Choir’s vision.

Throughout its life, Wessex Male Choir has benefited from the inspirational leadership of exceptional musical directors. Music professionals all, each has brought differing areas of choral expertise to test and develop the Choir. Their patience, humour, commitment and professionalism has motivated, cajoled and ultimately, constructed one of the most accomplished male choirs in the UK.

Whilst each of the Choir’s musical directors has had a unique style, the unifying theme from each has been a constant striving for excellence.  It certainly hasn’t always been easy, but between them, they have constructed a modern choir with an appetite for high standards and a desire to continually improve. The Choir has won over 20 prizes in competitions on the national and international stage, including the male choir competition at the Llangollen International Eisteddfod in 2011, and best male choir in the Jersey International Choral Festival in 2008.
Rob telling a joke

Rob Elliott, our first musical director, in fine form telling the audience a joke!

The Choir’s founding musical director, Robert T Elliott, created the Wessex and its bedrock principles, standards and organization.  Rob was keen to refresh male choral singing for the 21st century and to move away from the stuffy traditional repertoire to which many male choirs adhered.  The genre was showing signs of decay and declining popularity, with many choirs’ membership having an average age of over 65, and being unable to inject young blood to replace retiring singers.  Even notable and acclaimed choirs such as Côr Meibion Pontarddulais are feeling the pinch, and the traditional male voice choirs almost everywhere worry about the increasing average age of their choristers.  Rob was, and continues to be, at the forefront of a movement to enhance the relevance of male choir singing in the modern age, a group that also includes the likes of William Prideaux of Peterborough Male Voice Choir, Mark Burstow of Bournemouth Male Choir, and Tim Rhys-Evans of Only Men Aloud.

Rob left Wessex in 2013 and was appointed as Festival Director for the Cornwall International Male Choral Festival, the world’s largest male choir festival, featuring over 70 choirs from all over the world.  He also adjudicates at many prestigious choral festivals in the UK and overseas, as well as advising choirs as they prepare for competition.  More recently, he has also taken over the baton at Basingstoke Ladies Choir.

Cheltenham 2016 - Katrine Gold Cup

Katrine Reimers, with the Cheltenham Gold Cup in 2016.

Following Rob’s departure, the Wessex was fortunate to acquire another excellent musical director in Katrine Reimers, who led the Choir between January 2014 and July 2016.  Katrine studied music at King’s College, Cambridge, piano at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and trained as a professional repetiteur at the National Opera Studio.  Katrine led the choir on successful tours to Ireland and Italy (where she also conducted a massed festival choir of over 2000 singers in the singing of Verdi’s Va Pensiero), and under her direction, the Choir was victorious in the 2016 Cheltenham Festival of Performing Arts, winning the Male Choir competition, Show Tunes competition, and the Gold Cup itself for outstanding choir of the whole Festival despite never having worked with a male choir before.  Katrine built on the excellent foundations laid by her predecessor and, in particular, worked on developing the Choir’s musical expression, not least through her own very expressive and communicative conducting style.

Unfortunately for the Choir, Katrine’s abundant talents were noticed by others and she left the Wessex to take up a prestigious post working with youth choirs across Europe, although she is still involved with music locally around her home in Bath. Like her predecessor, Katrine remains a good friend of the Wessex and can still be seen occasionally in the audience at concerts, having made many friends during her time with the Choir.

Rhiannon copy

Rhiannon Williams conducting the Wessex Male Choir at Lechlade in 2017.

Continuing the fine line of excellent musical directors, the Choir’s current musical director is Rhiannon Williams who joined Wessex in 2016. Rhiannon’s conducting career began in 2002 as musical director of the Ynysybwl Ladies Choir, a position she held for ten years, during which the Choir won competitions at the Abergavenny and Hereford festivals. Rhiannon led Bridgend Male Choir to success at the 2014 Male Choir Competition in the Llangollen International Music Eisteddfod. This was notable since only Wales’ most successful competition choir, Cor Meibion Pontarddulais, had previously won the world-renowned competition from the South Wales area. In addition to this, Rhiannon has previously achieved success as an accompanist for the Bridgend Male Choir at the Cheltenham festival and has a wealth of experience working with other top Welsh choirs including Pontarddulais, Treorchy, and Llanelli.

A native of South Wales, Rhiannon began her musical life as a singer. Among many competition successes, she was named British (& Welsh) BET Choirgirl of the Year in 1989 (28 years ago today!).  This led to solo appearances at the Royal Albert Hall, and Cardiff’s

Unknown
Rhiannon was Choirgirl of the Year in 1989.

St David’s Hall, among other venues, and to membership of the National Youth Choirs of Wales and of Great Britain, the RSCM Cathedral Singers, and the Choir of St John’s, Smith Square.  Rhiannon’s professional piano training began with a part-time scholarship at London’s Royal Academy of Music. The London College of Music awarded her a Fellowship, and she has achieved Distinctions at Licentiate and Associate levels from the Trinity, Guildhall and Royal Schools of Music. In 1998 she became Principal Accompanist for the renowned Treorchy Male Choir, which ultimately bestowed on her an Honorary Lady Membership.  In addition to her day-job as a professional musician, she has also recently become the musical director for the Cowbridge Male Voice Choir.

In the hands of a great musical director, the Wessex Male Choir is like a finely-tuned instrument, capable of expressing great depths of emotion, astonishing tonal colour, and dynamic contrast that lends excitement, power, and sensitivity to its performances.  If you haven’t heard it for yourself, you really should!  For more information about singing with the Choir, hearing us in concert, or hiring us for an event, please visit our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk  You can also follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wessexmalechoir

Ladies: Send us your men!

In common with most male choirs, the Wessex Male Choir is always looking for new recruits. One of the ‘nice problems’ we have is that the average age in the Wessex Male Choir is quite a bit lower than most male choirs. We have a lot of younger men and, every year, because of work or family commitments, some of our singers reluctantly have to leave the Choir.  So recruiting is a never-ending challenge. The crazy thing is, it should be easy.   Ask any of the guys in who sing in the Wessex (or indeed, any other choir) and they will tell what a great experience it is.   So why aren’t more men queuing up to get in on the fun?

WMC Rehearsal - 10 Oct 17 copy.JPGGreg, Andy, Andy, Andy, and Mark share a joke with principal accompanist Tom during a rehearsal.   (Please note, due to the high number of ‘Andys’ in the Choir, any more wishing to join may have to change their name by deed poll.)

We ran an article recently in the Swindon Advertizer in which one of our singers, Paul Gahan, told us about how he came to join the Choir – and it’s interesting because he hits on some of the things that had put him off joining.  Paul says:

“There’s no denying it can be an intimidating thing joining a choir with a reputation like the Wessex, especially so for anyone who isn’t particularly musical. My wife spent six years trying to persuade me to join, but I kept insisting the standard was too high for me. Eventually a chance encounter with a Wessex chorister, on a windswept touchline at a rugby festival, persuaded me to turn up for a rehearsal and give it a go.

Having the courage to take that first step is the hardest part, but at the Wessex Male Choir, we make that as easy as possible. Men can pop-in to any choir rehearsal to see what it’s all about and to gain a sense of the Choir’s camaraderie and teamwork (we meet on Tuesday nights at Abbey Meads from 7.30-9.30pm) and they will be sure of the warmest of welcomes.   Bringing a friend along can also reduce any anxiety. Men who come along don’t have to sing (unless they want to join in); they can stay for as long or as little as they like; they can join other singers in the pub afterwards for a chat; and there’s no obligation if they decide it’s not for them. As Paul says:

I nearly walked out of my first rehearsal I was so terrified: I‘d never heard the piece I was supposed to be singing and I didn’t have a clue if I was singing the right notes or not, but with encouragement from the other singers, I stuck it out, eventually passed my audition and made it to concert standard. It was hard work, there’s no use pretending it was easy, but the support structure and learning aids at the Wessex are superb and you never have to cope alone.”

Although the male choir tradition is steeped in machismo (think of male choirs rooted in tough, mining communities), the repertoire of the male choir has moved on considerably. We still sing the occasional Welsh hymn tune, but these days, we do so much more than that! Our current repertoire includes rock anthems, songs from music theatre, pop arrangements, beautiful choral pieces and even the occasional rousing opera chorus or drinking song! And although male choir repertoire may have changed over the years, the sound of a male choir at full throttle has lost none of the powerful, virile sound which makes male choirs so popular with audiences.

Current Rep SelectionA selection of the Wessex Male Choir’s current very varied repertoire.

Our singers come from every walk of life and are all bound together by the love of singing.   Some can read music, but many cannot.   It’s not a barrier because the way the Choir learns music is designed to make sure everyone can enjoy their singing.   It does take some commitment of course: choristers need to spend a bit of time between rehearsals practicing the songs, although with the Choir’s online learning aids, it’s really easy to download rehearsal recordings or choral parts onto a smartphone (or burn a disc) so you can sing along in the car or in the shower!   As well as those with little or no singing experience, we also welcome more experienced singers.   We find that men who have sung with community choirs or rock choirs and who are looking to step up a gear, find the four-part singing and overall performance standard of the Wessex is exactly what they need to take their singing to the next level. We also have a chorister development programme which helps everyone improve their singing.   And right now is a really great time to join the Choir as we are starting to learn our Christmas music (so everyone will be in the same boat!).

I’ll leave the last word with Paul.

I’ve been a Wessex chorister for over four years and I can’t imagine life without the Choir. I’ve sung at Twickenham in front of 80,000 people, I’ve sung in cathedrals, concert halls and churches all over the country and abroad, I’ve won major choral competitions, made the most amazing friends and yes, I wish I’d joined ten years earlier.”

For more information on the Wessex Male Choir, including how to join us or come along to a rehearsal, please visit our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk

GE