Men Behaving Strangely!

Men’s singing has an image problem:  half the population perceive male choirs as ‘pale, male, and stale’ and a lot of men (young men in particular) see choral singing as really uncool, slightly questionable, and not at all the sort of thing that they would want to do in public. Men’s singing has an image problem, so any means by which we can dispel some of the myths about male choral singing, must surely be worth looking at.

Arguably, at opposite poles on the male singing spectrum there are male choirs whose focus is mainly social with a bit of singing thrown in for good measure (which sadly can give men’s choirs a poor name due to a lack of focus on the singing), and those choirs for whom championing quality performance and striving to be bloody good at what they do is an all important part of their vision for making men’s singing as good as it can be. However, it doesn’t have to be a binary choice: a choir that performs to a high standard musically can still have a great social side as well, even though achieving high music standards takes time and commitment, regular rehearsals and, sometimes, tough decisions when choristers aren’t meeting the required standard. That’s what we try to achieve in the Wessex Male Choir, and if guys in our choir aren’t prepared to do that, then they are in the wrong choir.  But of course trying to attract, and then retain new choristers into this high-octane mix is far from easy, with many prospective choristers loving what we do but feeling that they are ‘not good enough’ or that they do not have the time to commit properly – and we all know how blokes hate commitment! Like many other choirs, we struggle to get the balance right and look with great interest at other successful men’s singing groups to see how they ‘market’ themselves both to prospective members and potential audiences.  One such group is The Magnificent AK47, whose trademark blend of self-deprecating humour, masculine repertoire, funny hats, highly-entertaining shows and manly bonhomie has earned them many accolades as well as showing that it can be ‘cool’ to be in an all-male singing group. They will be our special guests at the Wessex Male Choir Summer Concert at STEAM in Swindon on Saturday 14th July.

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I first saw ‘The Magnificent AK47’ in action a few years back and instantly liked their style and what they are trying to achieve. The men’s singing group from ‘North, North Wiltshire’ (Ashton Keynes to be precise) is on a mission to get men into singing. The ‘traditional’ male choir model is definitely not for them, and as they say on their website (http://www.themagnificentak47.com)

We sing all sorts of material, mostly a capella, with occasional musical accompaniment from anyone sober enough to beat a drum decently or, for those beyond the drum, squeeze the odd note from a concertina. We create a sound that has been described by several wives as ‘surprisingly good’ and we finish in good time for the bar.

We sing right across, despite and beyond, the musical spectrum, from serious Georgian choral pieces, through the odd Wagnerian operatic piece, to less intellectual stuff employing hats and related costumery. Our performances are entirely suitable for all the family. Having said which, some of our repertoire is sung in Georgian and Old German and we’re not at all sure what the words mean. Any offence given to Georgians or Old Germans is entirely unintentional and the same goes for Swindon girls, of whom most of us are very fond.”

The group meets about every six weeks to sing songs and learn new material by ear under the charismatic leadership of their musical director, Chris Samuel. It’s clear that the enjoyment of singing and comradeship is all important.   They also run an annual event called Blokefest in a Wiltshire field (next to a pub) to which men flock from far and wide (and Wiltshire) – to enjoy a long weekend of manly activities including singing, drinking beer, barbecuing, pub games, and camping. This extract from the from the Blokefest website gives a flavour :

“Over one weekend in June we will be singing like blokes, acting like men and getting to be one of the guys.  BlokeFest is a festival by good Blokes for good Blokes, who like singing or think they might if only they could do it in the right way. Our guiding philosophy is that singing is a truly manly activity as long as you sing the right stuff, in the right way, with the right men: Think Shanties not shandies; Lumberjack not Timberlake; DiY not R’n’B.”

…and they profess to ‘unlock the inner minstrel by lowering the tone’!

Interestingly, although The Magnificent AK47 and the Wessex Male Choir have much in common, (not least our shared desire to get more men into singing for all the social, health, and artistic benefits it brings), we have slightly different visions of how to achieve it, but that’s not to say we don’t appreciate each other’s performances and maybe steal the odd trick or two from each other!

C1380-001 copy 2A few members from both the Wessex Male Choir and The Magnificent AK47 at STEAM recently. 

TMAK47’s philosophy and public image clearly demonstrate one way in which to attract new converts to men’s singing – and it’s one that certainly works for them. The ‘blokeishness’ may not suit everyone’s taste and with meeting only every six weeks, it may be that their guys are missing out on even greater singing and repertoire opportunities. However, it’s fair to say that some of their ideas influenced the design of our highly successful ‘Project RMS’(Real Men Sing) a few years ago. Project RMS offered a series focused events, marketed to appeal to men (activities such as singing on the pitch at Wembley, singing at the Defence Academy and getting close-up and personal with some military hardware, doing a flash-mob, and singing on the radio etc.) Even if, in the end, most of the new guys who came along did so because they knew someone who was already in the Choir, the Project gave them the impetus they needed to take that first cautious step.   Certainly it makes the traditional ‘bring a friend’ or ‘open rehearsal’ nights look a bit tame.

The Wessex Male Choir’s summer concert will be a great opportunity to see both groups in action, and as a special treat, we are combining forces for a few songs as well! The concert is at 7.3.30pm on Saturday 14th July in the Great Western Hall at STEAM in Swindon. Tickets also give access to the museum (and bar) from 6.30pm. Tickets are just £12.50 and are available from www.ticketsource.co.uk/wessex-male-choir

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Keeping Your Choristers Happy!

Looking back over some of the previous blogs on here, it seems that the focus has often been on how to recruit new members.   We often overlook our most valuable assets – the members we already have! So in a round-about way, this blog is about retaining people, and how to avoid some of the obvious pitfalls.  For various reasons, I had my grumpy head on when I first published this blog.   Since then I’ve re-read it and realized it was pants, so I’ve revised it.  It’s still pants, but at least it’s not so whingey!

I guess choir politics are pretty much the same whichever choir you belong to and without doubt, in a male choir, egos are never very far from the surface.   Personally, all I’m really interested in is the singing, and making that as good as it can be, but inevitably, if you’re passionate about something, you end up disagreeing with others, and this can become a source of disharmony in the choir if you let it.  Compromise and good communication can prevent choristers feeling that their contributions don’t count.  Most of us try very hard to subjugate our personal agendas to ‘the greater good’, (I can never say that without thinking about Hot Fuzz!) but I doubt that anyone ever really succeeds in doing so, despite the best of intentions.  Having an agreed Choir Vision that everyone can buy into is a good idea and takes away some of the guesswork! Be tolerant with others and remember, all of us think we’re better than we really are. For example, I think I can sing.

Lesson 1: No matter how good you think you are, a little humility and compromise never hurt anyone.

I was left ‘spitting feathers’ a few weeks back when someone quite brazenly claimed credit for something that I had done. Deep breath. Count to three, and move on.  Some people are just like that and most of your colleagues will see it for what it is.  I’ve noticed quite often in the past, that members can be quite critical of committee members, often without really understanding the at times difficult decisions that need to be made. I suppose that if you stand for the committee, you open yourself up to all manner of criticisms (mostly behind your back) and it goes with the territory.  If you’re in that privileged position, try to find the time to tell people informally about what the committee is doing for the Choir.  I’m not sure that posting your committee meeting minutes on the noticeboard really cuts it!

Lesson 2:  Treat everyone fairly and recognize their contributions, no matter how small.  If you’re on the committee, make a real effort to talk to members about what the committee is trying to achieve – and don’t be afraid to elicit opinions.  If you’re not on the committee, cut them some slack – they are trying their best and deserve encouragement. Of course, if you think you can do better, then put your money where your mouth is! In short, communicate, give credit where it’s due and don’t take credit for the work of others.

It’s funny how things tend to come in threes, shortly after having someone take credit for my work, and with just four days to go before a long-planned singing workshop, the visiting workshop leader pulled out due to ill-health.   I like a challenge, but that was a bit of stress I could have done without! Thankfully, my old friend, the amazing Dr Rebecca Berkley, stepped in to fill the void and delivered a superb workshop which I think made a positive and lasting impression on all who attended. (To be clear, when I say ‘old’ friend, I don’t mean she’s old – just that she was MD at Kennet Opera a few years back when I had the privilege of singing the role of MacDuff in Verdi’s Macbeth under her musical direction!) Fair to say, the workshop, which had been sponsored by One-Stop through their ‘Carriers for Causes’ scheme, was a great success, not least because we learnt a new round all about Gin and Tonic!

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Dr Rebecca Berkley leading the workshop astray with thoughts of Gin and Tonic!

No sooner had the dust settled on the workshop, than I received an e-mail from the local performing arts academy in Swindon where we had booked the auditorium for a weekend of recording work, only to be told (with a just a month’s notice), that they were cancelling the booking. I suppose I should be grateful it was a month’s notice and not just a week! However trying to find a good alternative location with the right acoustic and facilities at short notice isn’t a heap of laughs, and as the recording company deposit had already been paid and diaries cleared, changing the date wasn’t an option. Thankfully, one of our committee, Stuart,  for solved the problem (thank you Stu!) and found a location almost on his own doorstep!  The point is that it pays to build networks and tap into the your choir’s ‘collective knowledge’, whether it’s for a last-minute replacement for a workshop or a replacement venue!

Lesson 3: Many heads are better than one when it comes to problem-solving. Your members are your best asset – tap into their knowledge and connections. Do you even know what they all do, what skills they have, or who they know that might be able to help the choir?  Keep them all involved.  Team-working strengthens the sense of belonging.

The passion for singing is what keeps us coming back for more, but sometimes the singing (in my case, my own) doesn’t live up to expectations.  After one rehearsal recently, I found myself feeling unusually low and seriously contemplating my own departure in search of pastures new.  There’s a local singing group I’d love to join, but it meets on the same night as choir, so I can’t do both. It made me think that almost every chorister has something else they could be doing on rehearsal night, and sometimes the pull of the alternative is strongly felt.   I’d been feeling a bit crappy that night anyway, and once I had manned-up, I felt somewhat happier, so for now at least, the Choir will have to put up with me. The moral of the story is, no matter how ‘embedded’ someone seems in the Choir, it doesn’t prevent them having times when they wonder if it’s all worth it. Watch out for the signs and get them back on board quickly!

Lesson 4:  Never assume that your members are happy just because they’re not complaining. Engagement and valuing your members is everything here and the serial whingers whose voices are often loudest, may not be the ones you need to worry about!

One of the many things that makes it all worthwhile is the sweet smell of success. Back in March, the Wessex Male Choir had a particularly successful outing at the Mid-Somerset Festival in Bath where we managed first place in all three of the categories we had entered thanks in no small part to the brilliant leadership of our MD.   Our chamber choir, the Wessex Camerata, also entered a class but, perhaps not surprisingly given our new line-up which is still bedding-in, we only managed a creditable third place against some very good competition. Still it was a good test of the guys’ mettle.   Preparing for the competition was hard work, but as Samuel Goldwyn once said, ‘The harder I work, the luckier I get’ – it’s true both as a choir and on an individual basis.

Wessex MD, Rhiannon Williams, with two out of the three trophies won in Bath.

Lesson 5:  Success and hard work go hand-in-hand. Ensure that everyone understands this – there is no such thing as a free lunch or a short-cut to success! The sooner that choristers understand the connection, the happier they will be about having to work hard. Manage their expectations. No-one said it was going to be easy!

With preparations now well underway for the Cheltenham Festival of Performing Arts later this month, it would be easy to overlook some of the other great things we are doing this year. We’ll be recording our latest CD next month and, as well as a few well-known numbers to keep our traditionalist fans happy, the CD will be packed with new material and different genres. (Follow us on Facebook to hear about the launch of the CD and a special offer on pre-orders!) .

We’ve also received the first draft of a new song of Remembrance that we commissioned from the acclaimed British composer, Paul Mealor. Paul is unique in having held top chart positions in both the pop charts and classical charts simultaneously, and will be known to many as the composer of the Military Wives’ Choir hits Wherever You Are and in My Dreams.   The commission (supported in part by a Co-Op grant), is for male choir but with an optional descant, suitable for a school choir (our way of involving youngsters in remembering the fallen). We asked Paul to use some of the text from Laurence Binyon’s poem ‘For the Fallen’, which includes the well-known stanza that begins ‘They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old…’ and he has done a fabulous job.   All we need now is a good local school choir to help us perform the premiere at a big RBL event in October this year! Also in October, we’ll be performing in the Sheriff of Wiltshire’s event, An Uncelebrated Journey, a showcase for the best of Swindon talent.

We’re very much looking forward to our annual summer concert at STEAM in Swindon again this year (14th July) where our guests will be ‘The Magnificent AK47’ – an anarchic group of singing land-pirates and DIY-ers who are single-handedly changing perceptions about men’s singing. They wear hats, have far too much facial hair, and sing rousing stuff in a manly manner. We’re sure that our Swindon audience will love them! We’re especially looking forward to doing a few joint numbers with them including a rendition of the old English drinking song, ‘Down Among the Deadmen’.

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Brothers in song… Magnificent Wessex choristers with members of the Magnificent AK47!

Lesson 6:  Acentuate the positive! We have an interesting and varied selection of events and activities to look forward to – something for everyone. The promise of the next big gig or special event is often enough to keep people’s enthusiasm flowing!

Okay, I’m mad about singing and over the years, I’ve been lucky enough to benefit from hundreds (or maybe thousands) of hours of singing tuition from some outstanding singers (including Ros Plowright, Stuart Burrows, Ryland Davies, James Gilchrist, Gail Pearson, Susan McCulloch, Patricia Wheatley-O’Neill, Adrian Thompson and many more).   I’ve done masterclasses, consultations, summer schools, and more grade exams than I care to remember, all in the interest of improving my singing (especially as a soloist) and being the best I can be, given that I’ll never be more than a keen amateur. My poor family have been driven nearly insane.  I didn’t really start singing until twelve years ago and I’d like to think it’s never too late to learn new tricks, even for an old dog like me.  One thing is certain, we never stop learning.   So encourage choristers to learn, to attend workshops, to take lessons, to learn how to read music, to rise to musical challenges.  Making development opportunities available to choristers is a good way of keeping the challenge fresh and choristers engaged. The sense of accomplishment and recognition that comes with developing or learning new skills will keep your choristers happy!  As well as having a chorister development programme in the Wessex, our chamber group (the Wessex Camerata) provides some additional challenges in a cappella singing for those who want to push their boundaries a bit further.

Lesson 7:  Have a chorister development programme and provide plenty of opportunities for choristers to learn and improve. Have a culture that imbues choristers with the desire to do better, and make a point of rewarding those who make the effort.

There are probably many more things you can do to keep your choristers happy, I’ve just picked on a few that areas that represent quick wins.  Being in a really good choir is an incentive all of its own.   Above all, try and keep a sense of humour and make sure that singing is fun – but not at the expense of choir discipline!

GE

Are you an incompetent singer?

This week’s blog is meant as a challenge to all you singers out there.   You might think it is pretentious twaddle or you may find that it sets you a useful challenge.   Either way, I hope it provokes you to think about your singing and how competent you are as a singer.

Singing standards, audience appreciation, and competition success are all linked.   So whether you sing in an amateur choir or a professional ensemble, your skills as a singer ultimately dictate the success or otherwise of your singing group. That may seem obvious, but there’s far more to it than meets the eye, and it’s all to do with competence.

Back in the 1970s, a chap called Noel Burch described the four stages in learning any new skill and illustrated his ideas by using a ‘Competence Pyramid’.   No wait…don’t leave! I know it sounds like some esoteric management-gobbledygook, but it helps to explain a whole lot about how singers get good, how some audiences are more receptive than others, and how competition success can be achieved!

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Still here? Great. It’s probably easier if I explain the competence pyramid thingy by using a car-driving analogy – but it applies to almost any skill.

The first stage is blissful ignorance (or ‘unconscious incompetence’). For example: you have no idea what the clutch does, how to change gear, or even why you need to.   Then one day, you decide that you want to learn how to drive. Over a period of months, between nervous breakdowns, the driving instructor explains what the gears do, how to do three-point turns, and how to drive away from a junction without doing multiple ‘kangaroo’ hops like Skippy the Bush Kangaroo. It will take lots of practice until you can do it all safely, but even if you can’t do it yet, at least you now understand what is needed, and thankfully your driving instructor is on powerful medication.   This is the second stage and is known as ‘conscious incompetence’ because you now realize that you have a lot to learn!

Then the big day arrives: the driving test! Hopefully you pass and you are now officially ‘competent’ at driving a car (meaning that you have learnt all the basic skills required).   But there are some things you still have to work hard at: you probably need to concentrate when doing a three-point turn or parallel-parking.   To start with, you still have to think very carefully about how to drive your car, even if you have passed the test without squashing any pedestrians.   This is the third stage and it’s known as ‘conscious competence’.   You can do it safely and competently, but you’re no ninja and it still requires conscious effort.

After a number of years, most drivers happily drive their cars around fairly safely and seldom have to consciously think about how to do it. They can even do parallel-parking without mounting the kerb or backing into a lamp-post while still talking to their passenger and listening to the radio at the same time. In other words, driving has become almost automatic. This is the final stage of learning a new skill, and it’s called ‘unconscious competence’.

So what? How does that map across to singing? Well as a complete novice, you may not realize how difficult it is to sing well. You don’t know what you don’t know. You hear people singing all time on the telly and radio, and it all seems pretty effortless. So you decide to give it a try and you join a choir. The musical director keeps wittering on about breathing, support, diction, timing, dynamic control, blending, tonality, phrasing, and loads of other things. Suddenly, you realize that there’s more to this singing malarkey than meets the eye, and you transition from ‘unconscious incompetence’ into ‘conscious incompetence’. You realize how little you really know – but at least help is on hand to get you through the tricky bits!

You start to improve, but when you concentrate on perfecting your diction, maybe your phrasing suffers or your ‘support’ is lacking.   Doing everything that is required all at once is really hard and takes years of training until it all becomes second nature. Professional singers often spend years taking singing lessons before studying vocal performance for three years at college – and often then going on to post-graduate degrees in performance studies. But even after all that, most would agree that they are still learning.   In fact only a select few professional singers ever truly achieve the ‘unconscious competence’ stage!

Regular practice and singing lessons is the only way you will ever move from incompetence to competence.

Book

Members of the Wessex Male Choir appear in David Howard’s excellent book on Choral Singing.  (This book would make someone a great Christmas present! Details at end of article).

Learning the techniques that make you a better singer is all well and good, and it might be tempting to approach singing very technically (e.g. making sure your larynx is in the right place, using diaphragmatic breathing, and learning how to mix chest and head voice etc.) but unless it is well-practiced and automatic, it will distract you from your main job on stage which is that of communicating with the audience: you know, those discerning folk who have paid good money to hear you sing. But if you’re standing in front of an audience worrying about your breathing (or where you left your larynx), then you have probably lost whatever rapport you were hoping for! A technically excellent performance can be boring if it lacks rapport, but similarly, an emotionally-connected performance can also be spoilt by poor technique, especially if the audience is even a little bit knowledgeable.

Of course, audiences don’t have to be ‘competent’ in order to enjoy performances, and they certainly don’t have to pass a test before they can go to concerts! But it is clear that some audiences don’t really know the first thing about singing and will quite happily applaud a really mediocre performance. You can often see that in TV talent show audiences where they go crazy just because a singer belts out an ear-splitting top note (however badly) or cunningly evades the melody by warbling around it so much that you forget what they’re meant to be singing. Ignorance really can be bliss! But if you or your choir want to perform in front of knowledgeable or discerning audiences (which might include other singers and other choirs), then you will have master at least some of the technical skills needed. The MD can’t do it all for you. Of course, competition adjudicators tend to know rather a lot about singing and are well placed to recognize whether you, as a singer, have mastered some of the skills needed for a great performance and whether your choir is run-of-the-mill or something rather special.

There’s another good reason for wanting to improve your competence as a singer. Good singing technique helps to preserve your voice, both in the short term, and so that you can enjoy your singing long into the future. Truly great singers like Placido Domingo (now 76 and still singing in world-class opera) attributes much of his longevity as a singer to his constant focus on technique – a focus that continues to this day. I think we’ve all heard choirs performing at major competitions when on ‘Day One’ the sound is beautiful, but by the end of the competition or festival, tired voices are very evident and the sound quality is poor. This is most noticeable in amateur choirs and I know of at least two otherwise very good choirs who have probably missed out on winning a ‘Choir of Choirs’ prize due to lack of individual technique – or possibly too many celebratory beers after winning the earlier stages in competitions!

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The Wessex Male Choir in fine voice.

But how can any choir hope to do well in competition if the choristers don’t understand what the adjudicators are looking for? A quick internet search on choral adjudication turns up a wide range of competencies required for good choral singing. There’s an edited version of one such guide here: What Adjudicators Are Looking For.  It’s clear that the good technique associated with competent singers produces the sort of high quality singing that adjudicators and well-informed audiences cherish.

Even brilliant entertainers can suffer the consequences of poor technique and it can be career-limiting. I suppose the most famous examples are Adele and Julie Andrews, both of whom had wonderful voices but suffered damage to their vocal cords almost certainly as result of their singing technique. Whilst it is less common among classically-trained singers and opera singers (the Olympic athletes of the singing world), it is certainly not unheard of. There was a great article about stars losing their voices in The Guardian in August 2017 by Bernhard Warner. The link is here, and it’s well worth a read!

So this is where it gets personal: where do you think your singing fits into the ‘Competence Pyramid’? Even if you don’t aspire to be a great soloist, surely when you sing in a choir you want to be the best you can be in order to contribute to the overall success of the choir? If so, what steps have you taken to develop as a singer? It doesn’t happen by accident. Do you know how to support your breath properly? What is ‘support’? What is head voice? How often do you work on your diction? How well do you know the words, notes, phrasing, and dynamics of the piece you are singing? If none of these things mean anything to you, then you are still floundering around at the ‘unconscious incompetence’ stage and the chances are that your choir will never be anything special.

GE

Recommended Resources: 

http://www.vocalist.org.uk/index.html  – a good website for singers with all sorts of technique tips and singing exercises.

Books:

Choral Singing and Healthy Voice Production’ – by David M Howard (complete with the photo of WMC singers on page 106!).   An excellent book that covers just about everything to do with Choral Singing.   Available from Amazon and all good book stores!

‘Find Your Voice’ – by Jo Thompson.   A great all-round singing guide, also available from Amazon and all good book sellers!

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Memory and Banter!

It seems like ages ago now, but back in June 2016, we organized a short recording session at Commonweal School and recorded two tracks; Memory from Cats, and Morten Lauridsen’s O Magnum Mysterium. The intention was always to film them and put them on YouTube or something similar. Unfortunately, when we got to the editing stage, we felt that the recording quality wasn’t great and at the time, we never completed the edits. However, over a year later, we’ve managed to tweak the recordings and although the end-product is far from perfect, the first of the two recordings, Memory, is now online for people to watch. The second track, O Magnum Mysterium, will take a little longer to complete, but we hope that we can post that online too at some point.

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Recording ‘Memory’ at Commonweal – June 2016 under the direction of Katrine Reimers.

Over the years, there have been a number of smaller singing groups within the Choir, such as Presto and After Eight (the latter is now an independent group and no longer part of the Wessex Male Choir) and more recently we have had the Wessex Male Choir Chamber Group. It’s a bit of a mouthful, so we thought it was about time to give the Chamber Group a name. There were lots of suggestions from members of the Chamber Group – such as ‘Crotchety’ (because some choristers can be a bit grumpy) and ‘Quavers’ (because we’re a bit cheesy?). In the end, we opted for something a bit more stylish, and will be known henceforth as the Wessex Camerata, indicating that we are firmly part of the Wessex Male Choir but a chamber group. And before you tell me, yes I know the abbreviation is W.C.

You may already know that a male choir is usually split into four sections: the guys with the highest voices (top tenors); those with high voices (second tenors); the lower voices (baritones); and the ‘lowest of the low’ (the basses). There’s a great deal of banter and competition between sections, but at the end of the day, we all sing together in perfect harmony.  Even if you don’t know what voice type you are when you join the Choir, you’re quickly sorted into the best section for you and helped to settle-in by an appointed ‘buddy’. Amidst the bustle of the new term, we’re always delighted to welcome new choristers, and so far this term, we’re pleased to say hello to three prospective choristers, Andrew, Dan, and Jason.

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The Choir has lots of characters…the cartoon is not meant to represent actual choristers!

Potential singers can easily be put off joining, thinking that they could never do what we do, but most of us started out feeling that way. It’s a bit like the first time you get on a bike: you’ve seen other people do it, but it takes a bit of practice until you get it right! By sheer chance, one of our choristers wrote a little piece about joining the choir, which is reproduced below. And in case you were wondering, the author is a baritone!

‘Recruitment is an ongoing challenge for male choirs, and one of the recurring reasons we hear for not joining is “I can’t read music.” In fact neither can around 75% of the Choir, but this hasn’t stopped us from being one of the best male choirs in the UK. Since most of us don’t read music, you don’t need to either. All that is required is a love of singing, the willingness to attend rehearsals and the need to put effort into learning the songs.

Another thing we often hear when we talk to guys about joining us is “I can’t sing.” Almost everyone can sing, and there are lots of ways our chorister development programme can help you. It’s a misconception that singing excellence is a prerequisite for joining. We don’t expect you to sing like Pavarotti: we just want people who can sing in tune with a bunch of others, learn some words and do what the Music Director asks them to do – for example “don’t sing too loudly.”

In fact, even if you can’t sing well, you can join our 2nd Tenors. (NB this is a joke and illustrates the eternal banter between sections!) Having made that clear…..

Q. If you threw a pianist and a second tenor off a cliff, which one would hit the ground first?
A. The pianist. The second tenor would have to stop halfway down to ask directions.

Q. Why must you never leave second tenors out on their own?
A. They can never find the key and they always come in late.

So if, like us you take your singing seriously, but yourself less so, and
want to sing with like-minded individuals in one of the most successful male choirs in the UK and have a riot whilst doing so, why not give us a call? After all, what’s the worst that could happen (apart from joining the second tenors!)’

Continue reading “Memory and Banter!”

New term, new challenges!

The Wessex Male Choir is just starting a new exciting season and is looking for good singers!

Well, we’re off to a great start for our 2017/2018 Season, lots of exciting new repertoire, some new members, a new chairman, and a new principal accompanist!  At our first rehearsal we managed a complete sing-through in four-parts of the wonderful ‘And Can It be?’ arranged by Dan Forrest.   What a fabulous piece of music it is.

We’re always keen to hear from men who are interested in singing with the Wessex, and of course we run a number of recruiting events every year.  We kicked off this year with a small group of choristers singing in some of the pubs in Royal Wootton Bassett.  We sang about half a dozen songs in the Five Bells, The Cross Keys, The Crown, and the Angel, before finally heading off to the Ganges Restaurant for a good curry.   We received lots of wonderful feedback from the audiences, and hopefully, some of the men who heard us will try to get along to our rehearsal venue at the Church of Christ the Servant, Abbey Meads, Swindon (SN25 4YX).  We meet every Tuesday evening from 7.30pm-9.30pm and we would be delighted to welcome any chap who wants to find out more about the Choir.   There’s no obligation to join, just come along and listen. chat to us, and join in if you feel like it!  We’re a very sociable bunch, so you can always join us for a beer and chat afterwards in the pub next door if you prefer!

1.jpgSome of the chaps enjoying a song in the Angel, Royal Wootton Bassett, on 2 September, as part of the recruiting drive.

We’re going to be busy in September preparing for our first concert of the season which is at the Methodist Church in Cirencester on Saturday 7th October.   The concert is a fundraiser for the Royal British Legion.  We suffered a bit of a set-back this week because the Welsh Male Voice Choir that should have been coming to take part in the concert has pulled out, but we’ll still have a great programme featuring both the Wessex Male Choir main choir and our very accomplished Chamber Group.  A week after that we’ll be in Lechlade, singing in a concert in aid of the Village Hall Appeal.   Details of both concerts and how to get tickets are available on our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk 

21432770_1152848664848434_4167066721726621310_n.jpgNow is a great time to join the Choir:  we’re learning new songs, so everyone is in the same boat!

We’re very pleased to welcome on board Tom Graff who has started as our new principal accompanist.  We also have a new Chairman, Simon Warren, who has taken over from Guy Edwards (who remains as part of the choir’s management group, but fancied a change of portfolio!).  We’re all looking forward to the new season immensely and know that our brilliant musical director, Rhiannon Williams-Hale, will be working us hard.  Over the summer, we also welcomed renowned British composer and TV & Radio Presenter, Howard Goodall, as our second patron alongside Aled Jones.

If you sing already in a community choir or other singing group, but you’re ready to step up to something more exciting, then please get in touch – we’d love to hear from you!