Men Behaving Strangely!

Men’s singing has an image problem:  half the population perceive male choirs as ‘pale, male, and stale’ and a lot of men (young men in particular) see choral singing as really uncool, slightly questionable, and not at all the sort of thing that they would want to do in public. Men’s singing has an image problem, so any means by which we can dispel some of the myths about male choral singing, must surely be worth looking at.

Arguably, at opposite poles on the male singing spectrum there are male choirs whose focus is mainly social with a bit of singing thrown in for good measure (which sadly can give men’s choirs a poor name due to a lack of focus on the singing), and those choirs for whom championing quality performance and striving to be bloody good at what they do is an all important part of their vision for making men’s singing as good as it can be. However, it doesn’t have to be a binary choice: a choir that performs to a high standard musically can still have a great social side as well, even though achieving high music standards takes time and commitment, regular rehearsals and, sometimes, tough decisions when choristers aren’t meeting the required standard. That’s what we try to achieve in the Wessex Male Choir, and if guys in our choir aren’t prepared to do that, then they are in the wrong choir.  But of course trying to attract, and then retain new choristers into this high-octane mix is far from easy, with many prospective choristers loving what we do but feeling that they are ‘not good enough’ or that they do not have the time to commit properly – and we all know how blokes hate commitment! Like many other choirs, we struggle to get the balance right and look with great interest at other successful men’s singing groups to see how they ‘market’ themselves both to prospective members and potential audiences.  One such group is The Magnificent AK47, whose trademark blend of self-deprecating humour, masculine repertoire, funny hats, highly-entertaining shows and manly bonhomie has earned them many accolades as well as showing that it can be ‘cool’ to be in an all-male singing group. They will be our special guests at the Wessex Male Choir Summer Concert at STEAM in Swindon on Saturday 14th July.

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I first saw ‘The Magnificent AK47’ in action a few years back and instantly liked their style and what they are trying to achieve. The men’s singing group from ‘North, North Wiltshire’ (Ashton Keynes to be precise) is on a mission to get men into singing. The ‘traditional’ male choir model is definitely not for them, and as they say on their website (http://www.themagnificentak47.com)

We sing all sorts of material, mostly a capella, with occasional musical accompaniment from anyone sober enough to beat a drum decently or, for those beyond the drum, squeeze the odd note from a concertina. We create a sound that has been described by several wives as ‘surprisingly good’ and we finish in good time for the bar.

We sing right across, despite and beyond, the musical spectrum, from serious Georgian choral pieces, through the odd Wagnerian operatic piece, to less intellectual stuff employing hats and related costumery. Our performances are entirely suitable for all the family. Having said which, some of our repertoire is sung in Georgian and Old German and we’re not at all sure what the words mean. Any offence given to Georgians or Old Germans is entirely unintentional and the same goes for Swindon girls, of whom most of us are very fond.”

The group meets about every six weeks to sing songs and learn new material by ear under the charismatic leadership of their musical director, Chris Samuel. It’s clear that the enjoyment of singing and comradeship is all important.   They also run an annual event called Blokefest in a Wiltshire field (next to a pub) to which men flock from far and wide (and Wiltshire) – to enjoy a long weekend of manly activities including singing, drinking beer, barbecuing, pub games, and camping. This extract from the from the Blokefest website gives a flavour :

“Over one weekend in June we will be singing like blokes, acting like men and getting to be one of the guys.  BlokeFest is a festival by good Blokes for good Blokes, who like singing or think they might if only they could do it in the right way. Our guiding philosophy is that singing is a truly manly activity as long as you sing the right stuff, in the right way, with the right men: Think Shanties not shandies; Lumberjack not Timberlake; DiY not R’n’B.”

…and they profess to ‘unlock the inner minstrel by lowering the tone’!

Interestingly, although The Magnificent AK47 and the Wessex Male Choir have much in common, (not least our shared desire to get more men into singing for all the social, health, and artistic benefits it brings), we have slightly different visions of how to achieve it, but that’s not to say we don’t appreciate each other’s performances and maybe steal the odd trick or two from each other!

C1380-001 copy 2A few members from both the Wessex Male Choir and The Magnificent AK47 at STEAM recently. 

TMAK47’s philosophy and public image clearly demonstrate one way in which to attract new converts to men’s singing – and it’s one that certainly works for them. The ‘blokeishness’ may not suit everyone’s taste and with meeting only every six weeks, it may be that their guys are missing out on even greater singing and repertoire opportunities. However, it’s fair to say that some of their ideas influenced the design of our highly successful ‘Project RMS’(Real Men Sing) a few years ago. Project RMS offered a series focused events, marketed to appeal to men (activities such as singing on the pitch at Wembley, singing at the Defence Academy and getting close-up and personal with some military hardware, doing a flash-mob, and singing on the radio etc.) Even if, in the end, most of the new guys who came along did so because they knew someone who was already in the Choir, the Project gave them the impetus they needed to take that first cautious step.   Certainly it makes the traditional ‘bring a friend’ or ‘open rehearsal’ nights look a bit tame.

The Wessex Male Choir’s summer concert will be a great opportunity to see both groups in action, and as a special treat, we are combining forces for a few songs as well! The concert is at 7.3.30pm on Saturday 14th July in the Great Western Hall at STEAM in Swindon. Tickets also give access to the museum (and bar) from 6.30pm. Tickets are just £12.50 and are available from www.ticketsource.co.uk/wessex-male-choir

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Male Choirs: A dying breed or an exciting opportunity?

Even in the Welsh heartlands, that bastion of male choral singing, choirs are struggling to recruit new singers and inevitably, some will simply fade away into silence, taking with them a once proud tradition of community spirit and male singing.   Their failure to evolve into something attractive to a new generation of singers seals their fate, but it doesn’t have to be this way.

The stereotypical image of old men in blazers singing traditional Welsh hymn tunes is one that many men’s choirs, including the Swindon-based Wessex Male Choir, are working hard to dispel, but like all deeply-embedded stereotypes, it is proving difficult to shake off, and even innovative choirs have to tread a fine line between alienating audiences that love the traditional songs, and attracting new audiences and singers who want something more contemporary.

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‘The Men in Black’ – Wessex Male Choir & Music Director Rhiannon Williams

So how do male choirs fight back and ensure that they remain relevant to today’s audiences and singers? There are plenty of articles in the press about the demise of male choirs, but considerably fewer offering suggestions for how the genre could evolve and develop. Science hasn’t yet reached the point where we can clone Gareth Malone, (and maybe that’s a good thing), so there’s no easy answer: if there were, then every male choir would be thriving.   However, it’s fair to say there are some emerging trends among successful choirs that may point the way.   Arguably, it is also true that choirs that are successful in attracting new audiences, are also successful in attracting new choristers: the two go hand-in-hand.

Butlin’s Bluecoats or an Undertakers’ Convention?

The first problem is the look. As smart as it may be, for many people, a choir dressed in blazers seems very old fashioned. But what to replace it with is equally challenging. For many years, Wessex choristers have worn black trousers and open-necked long-sleeved black shirts when performing (although sometimes we wear DJs and red bow ties – or a garish selection of Christmas pullovers). But even the black shirts are now commonplace and maybe rather passé.   Various choirs have experimented with different coloured shirts, different ties, bow ties, waistcoasts, jackets, and altogether more informal styles such as rugby shirts, ‘working clothes’ and even pirate costumes. The jury is out as to which works best because there are still occasions that call for a more formal look. I remember on one occasion when we tried our black shirts with bow ties we looked like an undertakers’ convention! And trying to look ‘cool’ if you have a Zimmer frame or a beer belly is also tricky, but somehow choirs have to find a cost-effective style that works and doesn’t send younger audiences and singers running for the hills.

Wesley’s Greatest Hits

The second problem is repertoire. I don’t think any male choirs want to completely turn their backs on the wealth of wonderful tunes represented by the traditional male voice choir genre, but if we are to attract younger audiences there has to be a desire to innovate and try new stuff including pop and rock arrangements, and choral works by modern composers. Getting the balance right can be difficult, and selecting the right material is also hard with most choirs having to indulge in a costly bit of trial and error to find songs that really work. Whilst there are some good arrangers out there, there is also a shortage of great arrangements of modern pieces for TTBB (tenor/tenor/baritone/bass) choirs, and quite often, the cost of obtaining the rights to arrange a great pop song, rock anthem or music theatre piece can be prohibitive.   I know from personal experience that trying to secure arrangement permissions from companies like Disney, who own the rights to a huge number of very popular songs, can be too costly to contemplate.   The Wessex Male Choir strongly encourages our choristers and our audiences to suggest songs they would like us to sing.   This can be a double-edged sword at times because it can create expectations that are difficult or impossible to deliver.   To ‘manage’ all the suggestions, we have a repertoire advisory team (RAT) that supports the Music Director in finding new pieces. A lot of the suggestions received by the RAT are simply not viable because of copyright or performing rights issues; because there are no suitable arrangements available; or simply because the style of piece relies too much on other voices (e.g. sopranos) or long instrumental riffs for guitar and drums that sound pants when played on a piano! It’s early days for our RAT, but with the encouragement of our Music Director, we are already building a sizeable chunk of enjoyable new repertoire that is quite different to most other choirs: but we still have a long way to go!

A Bunch of Stiffs

The third problem is the challenge of being ‘entertaining’. Serried ranks of choristers standing rigidly to attention on stage is a real turn-off for everyone except retired sergeant-majors (who are strange people anyway). Choirs need movement to help them express the joy and energy of the songs they sing, and just as dynamic contrast can deliver spine-tingling moments, so too can stillness when contrasted with movement. Choralography (the art of putting choreographed moves together with choral music) needs careful handling if it isn’t to look silly or detract from the music. The music has to come first. Choralography needs to be slick, polished, and rehearsed to perfection if it is to work. And if your choir is populated by 70-year olds, the moves might be quite limited (e.g. no splits, pirouhettes, or balletic grand jetés!). Other forms of stagecraft can also help make the performance more interesting: use flags, torches, umbrellas, hats, false beards; stand in a different formation, move about while singing, hang the second tenors upside down from the ceiling (please)…anything but be more imaginative than just standing on parade and your audience will love you for it.

The disappointing news is that when you’ve done all this successfully, there’s still no guarantee that you’ll attract younger audiences or younger choristers. The trouble is, there are just too many other distractions for them. So how do you make singing so ‘cool’ that they will choose singing over other options? I’m not sure, but here are a few recruiting ideas to consider.

Recruiting.

At present, we still get most of our new recruits via existing choristers.   Your members are your best advert and they need to advocate vigorously on behalf of the choir. Get them talking about the choir to men at work, in the pub, in the club and at the game – and anywhere else! Their enthusiasm is the biggest selling point you have, and make sure they are well supported with a plentiful supply of attractive business cards, flyers and other recruiting literature.   Gone are the days when you could just put on an ‘open evening’ and expect men to flock in. As Einstein said, “the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results”, so be bold, try new things to attract new choristers.

Last year, the Wessex Male Choir ran a very successful recruiting campaign called Project RMS (Real Men Sing), which included singing at Wembley in front of 85,000 people, visiting a local military base (examining the hardware and singing in one of the messes), a flash-mob, getting broadcast on local radio, and singing in a concert – all without any obligation to join the choir!

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Part of the Wessex Male Choir’s ‘Project RMS’ recruiting trifold from last year.

Even better is to give men a reason to sing, rather than expect them to admit they rather fancy the idea! Get them singing to raise money for charity. Just think how many outrageously hideous moustaches you’ve seen in Movember? Perfectly nice, rational men who for the rest of the year look almost respectable suddenly turn into hairy slug-balancers and sprout the most ridiculous 1970’s porn-star moustaches…in the name of charity! Joining a choir (even temporarily) to sing in a charity fundraiser is the excuse that men might need, and it’s nowhere near as bad as having to grow dodgy-looking face furniture.

Use social media as much as possible. Write a blog. Create memes for Facebook and Twitter. Get people talking about your choir! Consider using targeted advertising on Facebook where you pay to ‘boost’ a post to a specific demographic. For example, for recruiting, you might want to target 30-60 year old men with an interest in concerts and singing who live within 20 miles of where you are based. Facebook should then serve up your post into their Facebook ‘feed’ and hopefully, you’ll get your message across.

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An example of some recent Wessex Male Choir memes for Facebook and Twitter.

Get collaborating – especially with youth choirs. Not only do they generally drag their proud parents along to hear them sing, but as they transition from a youth choir into something more adult, if they have seen you perform and maybe shared the stage with you, there’s a good chance they’ll consider joining you.   But please, don’t be a ‘vampire’!

Old Vampires and Young Blood!

How many times have you heard old choirs talking about needing young blood? I hate the term – it makes us sound like a bunch of desperate old vampires! And that brings me onto a related topic: all too often, the existing members see the need for new members but don’t want them to ‘rock-the-boat’: in other words, some older members can be very resistant to change. The choir has to belong to the new members too – so do what you can to empower them.   Seek their views on everything from stagecraft to repertoire, and dress code. You need them more than they need you.

Recruiting from Colleges and Schools

Recruiting from schools and colleges may seem like an obvious approach for finding younger singers but it can be hard work getting the right access and finding the right event format. The offer of running a singing workshop, or performing at a school assembly may seem good to us, but to a busy school with a jam-packed curriculum, it may not be met with quite such enthusiasm. Getting the lads to sing in front of their mates is also likely to be tricky unless you have got something really interesting to offer them. In my experience, this recruiting path seldom delivers, but when it does, it can build a core of younger singers that will help to attract more.   (Don’t forget to use your younger singers in your publicity photos!) Having a youth choir is perhaps the best way of getting younger men interested in singing, but very few choirs have the resources to be able to offer this unless working in collaboration with a school or the local music hub. Sadly, even when you’ve enjoyed some success in recruiting younger choristers, the investment can often be negated by the pull of university and all manner of other attractions, but this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try.

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The success of groups such as Only Boys Aloud shows that boys can be encouraged into singing!

Retaining all your new recruits can be a challenge: even following our very successful Project RMS, we struggled to retain some of the newbies. The Wessex is an auditioned choir with high standards and that requires a lot of time and effort from our choristers, so inevitably, some of our new recruits reluctantly felt that they couldn’t commit.   We try to make it as easy as possible though: we have a buddying system to help new recruits; there is no shortage of support, encouragement and advice from section leaders and other choristers, and we have a first-rate set of online resources for helping people to learn the songs. For example, every rehearsal is recorded, just in case you want to go over something again! Lastly, having a chorister development programme helps to build confidence and attract singers as well as improving the overall standard of the singing. It is something that no good choir should be without.

I hope this article has given you some ideas about how male choirs might tackle some of the common problems we all share. We would love to hear your ideas too. Let’s grasp this exciting opportunity to transform the genre! The alternative is unthinkable.

Guy Edwards


Some articles about the challenges facing male choirs.

Welsh male voice choirs struggle to attract young (BBC 2012) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-19173496

Can the male voice choir survive in the modern world? (The Daily Telegraph -2016) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-filter/can-the-male-voice-choir-survive-in-the-modern-world/

Welsh male voice choirs: a vocal minority (The Guardian -2011) https://www.theguardian.com/music/2011/feb/01/welsh-choir-only-men-aloud

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Ladies: Send us your men!

In common with most male choirs, the Wessex Male Choir is always looking for new recruits. One of the ‘nice problems’ we have is that the average age in the Wessex Male Choir is quite a bit lower than most male choirs. We have a lot of younger men and, every year, because of work or family commitments, some of our singers reluctantly have to leave the Choir.  So recruiting is a never-ending challenge. The crazy thing is, it should be easy.   Ask any of the guys in who sing in the Wessex (or indeed, any other choir) and they will tell what a great experience it is.   So why aren’t more men queuing up to get in on the fun?

WMC Rehearsal - 10 Oct 17 copy.JPGGreg, Andy, Andy, Andy, and Mark share a joke with principal accompanist Tom during a rehearsal.   (Please note, due to the high number of ‘Andys’ in the Choir, any more wishing to join may have to change their name by deed poll.)

We ran an article recently in the Swindon Advertizer in which one of our singers, Paul Gahan, told us about how he came to join the Choir – and it’s interesting because he hits on some of the things that had put him off joining.  Paul says:

“There’s no denying it can be an intimidating thing joining a choir with a reputation like the Wessex, especially so for anyone who isn’t particularly musical. My wife spent six years trying to persuade me to join, but I kept insisting the standard was too high for me. Eventually a chance encounter with a Wessex chorister, on a windswept touchline at a rugby festival, persuaded me to turn up for a rehearsal and give it a go.

Having the courage to take that first step is the hardest part, but at the Wessex Male Choir, we make that as easy as possible. Men can pop-in to any choir rehearsal to see what it’s all about and to gain a sense of the Choir’s camaraderie and teamwork (we meet on Tuesday nights at Abbey Meads from 7.30-9.30pm) and they will be sure of the warmest of welcomes.   Bringing a friend along can also reduce any anxiety. Men who come along don’t have to sing (unless they want to join in); they can stay for as long or as little as they like; they can join other singers in the pub afterwards for a chat; and there’s no obligation if they decide it’s not for them. As Paul says:

I nearly walked out of my first rehearsal I was so terrified: I‘d never heard the piece I was supposed to be singing and I didn’t have a clue if I was singing the right notes or not, but with encouragement from the other singers, I stuck it out, eventually passed my audition and made it to concert standard. It was hard work, there’s no use pretending it was easy, but the support structure and learning aids at the Wessex are superb and you never have to cope alone.”

Although the male choir tradition is steeped in machismo (think of male choirs rooted in tough, mining communities), the repertoire of the male choir has moved on considerably. We still sing the occasional Welsh hymn tune, but these days, we do so much more than that! Our current repertoire includes rock anthems, songs from music theatre, pop arrangements, beautiful choral pieces and even the occasional rousing opera chorus or drinking song! And although male choir repertoire may have changed over the years, the sound of a male choir at full throttle has lost none of the powerful, virile sound which makes male choirs so popular with audiences.

Current Rep SelectionA selection of the Wessex Male Choir’s current very varied repertoire.

Our singers come from every walk of life and are all bound together by the love of singing.   Some can read music, but many cannot.   It’s not a barrier because the way the Choir learns music is designed to make sure everyone can enjoy their singing.   It does take some commitment of course: choristers need to spend a bit of time between rehearsals practicing the songs, although with the Choir’s online learning aids, it’s really easy to download rehearsal recordings or choral parts onto a smartphone (or burn a disc) so you can sing along in the car or in the shower!   As well as those with little or no singing experience, we also welcome more experienced singers.   We find that men who have sung with community choirs or rock choirs and who are looking to step up a gear, find the four-part singing and overall performance standard of the Wessex is exactly what they need to take their singing to the next level. We also have a chorister development programme which helps everyone improve their singing.   And right now is a really great time to join the Choir as we are starting to learn our Christmas music (so everyone will be in the same boat!).

I’ll leave the last word with Paul.

I’ve been a Wessex chorister for over four years and I can’t imagine life without the Choir. I’ve sung at Twickenham in front of 80,000 people, I’ve sung in cathedrals, concert halls and churches all over the country and abroad, I’ve won major choral competitions, made the most amazing friends and yes, I wish I’d joined ten years earlier.”

For more information on the Wessex Male Choir, including how to join us or come along to a rehearsal, please visit our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk

GE

Memory and Banter!

It seems like ages ago now, but back in June 2016, we organized a short recording session at Commonweal School and recorded two tracks; Memory from Cats, and Morten Lauridsen’s O Magnum Mysterium. The intention was always to film them and put them on YouTube or something similar. Unfortunately, when we got to the editing stage, we felt that the recording quality wasn’t great and at the time, we never completed the edits. However, over a year later, we’ve managed to tweak the recordings and although the end-product is far from perfect, the first of the two recordings, Memory, is now online for people to watch. The second track, O Magnum Mysterium, will take a little longer to complete, but we hope that we can post that online too at some point.

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Recording ‘Memory’ at Commonweal – June 2016 under the direction of Katrine Reimers.

Over the years, there have been a number of smaller singing groups within the Choir, such as Presto and After Eight (the latter is now an independent group and no longer part of the Wessex Male Choir) and more recently we have had the Wessex Male Choir Chamber Group. It’s a bit of a mouthful, so we thought it was about time to give the Chamber Group a name. There were lots of suggestions from members of the Chamber Group – such as ‘Crotchety’ (because some choristers can be a bit grumpy) and ‘Quavers’ (because we’re a bit cheesy?). In the end, we opted for something a bit more stylish, and will be known henceforth as the Wessex Camerata, indicating that we are firmly part of the Wessex Male Choir but a chamber group. And before you tell me, yes I know the abbreviation is W.C.

You may already know that a male choir is usually split into four sections: the guys with the highest voices (top tenors); those with high voices (second tenors); the lower voices (baritones); and the ‘lowest of the low’ (the basses). There’s a great deal of banter and competition between sections, but at the end of the day, we all sing together in perfect harmony.  Even if you don’t know what voice type you are when you join the Choir, you’re quickly sorted into the best section for you and helped to settle-in by an appointed ‘buddy’. Amidst the bustle of the new term, we’re always delighted to welcome new choristers, and so far this term, we’re pleased to say hello to three prospective choristers, Andrew, Dan, and Jason.

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The Choir has lots of characters…the cartoon is not meant to represent actual choristers!

Potential singers can easily be put off joining, thinking that they could never do what we do, but most of us started out feeling that way. It’s a bit like the first time you get on a bike: you’ve seen other people do it, but it takes a bit of practice until you get it right! By sheer chance, one of our choristers wrote a little piece about joining the choir, which is reproduced below. And in case you were wondering, the author is a baritone!

‘Recruitment is an ongoing challenge for male choirs, and one of the recurring reasons we hear for not joining is “I can’t read music.” In fact neither can around 75% of the Choir, but this hasn’t stopped us from being one of the best male choirs in the UK. Since most of us don’t read music, you don’t need to either. All that is required is a love of singing, the willingness to attend rehearsals and the need to put effort into learning the songs.

Another thing we often hear when we talk to guys about joining us is “I can’t sing.” Almost everyone can sing, and there are lots of ways our chorister development programme can help you. It’s a misconception that singing excellence is a prerequisite for joining. We don’t expect you to sing like Pavarotti: we just want people who can sing in tune with a bunch of others, learn some words and do what the Music Director asks them to do – for example “don’t sing too loudly.”

In fact, even if you can’t sing well, you can join our 2nd Tenors. (NB this is a joke and illustrates the eternal banter between sections!) Having made that clear…..

Q. If you threw a pianist and a second tenor off a cliff, which one would hit the ground first?
A. The pianist. The second tenor would have to stop halfway down to ask directions.

Q. Why must you never leave second tenors out on their own?
A. They can never find the key and they always come in late.

So if, like us you take your singing seriously, but yourself less so, and
want to sing with like-minded individuals in one of the most successful male choirs in the UK and have a riot whilst doing so, why not give us a call? After all, what’s the worst that could happen (apart from joining the second tenors!)’

Continue reading “Memory and Banter!”

New term, new challenges!

The Wessex Male Choir is just starting a new exciting season and is looking for good singers!

Well, we’re off to a great start for our 2017/2018 Season, lots of exciting new repertoire, some new members, a new chairman, and a new principal accompanist!  At our first rehearsal we managed a complete sing-through in four-parts of the wonderful ‘And Can It be?’ arranged by Dan Forrest.   What a fabulous piece of music it is.

We’re always keen to hear from men who are interested in singing with the Wessex, and of course we run a number of recruiting events every year.  We kicked off this year with a small group of choristers singing in some of the pubs in Royal Wootton Bassett.  We sang about half a dozen songs in the Five Bells, The Cross Keys, The Crown, and the Angel, before finally heading off to the Ganges Restaurant for a good curry.   We received lots of wonderful feedback from the audiences, and hopefully, some of the men who heard us will try to get along to our rehearsal venue at the Church of Christ the Servant, Abbey Meads, Swindon (SN25 4YX).  We meet every Tuesday evening from 7.30pm-9.30pm and we would be delighted to welcome any chap who wants to find out more about the Choir.   There’s no obligation to join, just come along and listen. chat to us, and join in if you feel like it!  We’re a very sociable bunch, so you can always join us for a beer and chat afterwards in the pub next door if you prefer!

1.jpgSome of the chaps enjoying a song in the Angel, Royal Wootton Bassett, on 2 September, as part of the recruiting drive.

We’re going to be busy in September preparing for our first concert of the season which is at the Methodist Church in Cirencester on Saturday 7th October.   The concert is a fundraiser for the Royal British Legion.  We suffered a bit of a set-back this week because the Welsh Male Voice Choir that should have been coming to take part in the concert has pulled out, but we’ll still have a great programme featuring both the Wessex Male Choir main choir and our very accomplished Chamber Group.  A week after that we’ll be in Lechlade, singing in a concert in aid of the Village Hall Appeal.   Details of both concerts and how to get tickets are available on our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk 

21432770_1152848664848434_4167066721726621310_n.jpgNow is a great time to join the Choir:  we’re learning new songs, so everyone is in the same boat!

We’re very pleased to welcome on board Tom Graff who has started as our new principal accompanist.  We also have a new Chairman, Simon Warren, who has taken over from Guy Edwards (who remains as part of the choir’s management group, but fancied a change of portfolio!).  We’re all looking forward to the new season immensely and know that our brilliant musical director, Rhiannon Williams-Hale, will be working us hard.  Over the summer, we also welcomed renowned British composer and TV & Radio Presenter, Howard Goodall, as our second patron alongside Aled Jones.

If you sing already in a community choir or other singing group, but you’re ready to step up to something more exciting, then please get in touch – we’d love to hear from you!