One Chorister’s Story

This week’s blog is written by one of the Wessex Male Choir choristers, Andy Hamer, who tells of how he rediscovered the joy of singing in a Choir.


Ireland Tour Taney Concert-18

Wessex choristers Jeff, Andy Hamer, Carl and Garry unwinding on tour in Ireland.

This is my story of returning to group singing after 15 years in the wilderness.

Many of us sing, we may feel we are good at it or don’t even care if we are or not – it makes us feel good to sing, hum a tune, or sing along to our favourite songs.

Some of us will have grown up in the time-honoured tradition of church music as choristers on Sundays singing religious music, hymns and anthems under the direction of an organist /choirmaster trying their best to get four parts to work with ever diminishing numbers.   This was me back in the late 1970s when I first auditioned for my local church choir aged nine.  I spent over 10 years as boy chorister and then as a tenor with a six-month gap bell-ringing while my voice broke and settled. It was as a young boy soprano that I first was drawn to the joy of choral singing and four-part harmony (sometime six parts). We had a passionate Welsh choirmaster who was keen on opera and attempted some very fine pieces over the years such a Fauré’s Requiem and the Bell Anthem: not bad for a small village church choir. He taught us the basics of breathing, good diction, and the correct use of vowels, and was a truly inspirational figure to whom I owe a lot. I remember singing in Lichfield Cathedral with over 20 other choirs, standing in awe listening to the sound reverberating through the majestic cathedral – a real buzz at the tender age of 11.

As I got older the attraction of singing sacred choral music dwindled and other areas of life became more interesting, fueled by raging hormones: – wine, women,  etc. This was the time of Garage Rock and my first rock band. In a band aptly named “Above a Garage” (simply because we practiced above the drummer’s garage. Okay, not very original, but it was honest.) I was still singing, but now playing bass guitar (badly) and we were attempting our own compositions. Luckily for the world, none of our music ever got published or produced onto vinyl. It was fun while it lasted and at least I can say we sold out our only gig!  This short-lived excursion into rock and roll ended with my university years where, for a very short period of time, I returned to the church choir, regaining and rediscovering the joy of singing choral music especially around Christmas time.

There then followed the career and ambition years, driven by the need for position and sacrificing personal time for promotions and reward. A brief stint with a country folk band called “Still, Novak and Good” (say it quickly and you will get the drift!) saw some fun around children in need fundraising  – it was the first and only time I had a pair of ladies’ knickers thrown at me when performing – Tom Jones eat your heart out! We were paid in beer which is interesting when you get to the last song of the evening and cannot stand up let alone see the words!  However this period of 15 years is where I feel I missed out on the joy I have found singing with Wessex Male Choir.

Singing is a fantastic opportunity to de-stress the body naturally – endorphins are produced in the body when we sing that helps us relax: the blood pressure drops naturally and you forget the trials and tribulations of daily life. It’s got to be good for you hasn’t it?

When I set up my own company six years ago, I have to thank my wife Jo who said “you need something to escape into or you will work yourself into an early grave sitting at a PC  for 14 hours a day!”   So she found a contact number for Nick, the Choir’s secretary, and off I went to a rehearsal. The guys, and the MD at the time (Rob Elliott), made me feel very welcome and encouraged me to bring back all I had learnt many years ago and just to have a go. Three weeks later I was a full member having passed what can be described as a tricky audition process with the MD singing a completely different music line in my face just to see if I could hold my own line – it showed the standards that he and the rest of the Choir expected. I can say the audition process now is much less intimidating!

Wembley 30 Oct 16

The Wessex Male Choir singing at Wembley in 2016 in front of 85,000.

From that moment on I can simply say it has been fantastic: music festivals, competitions, Christmas concerts, tours to Ireland and to Italy, and many cherished memories I will never forget with what can only be described as an extended family. Singing a wide variety of music ranging from sacred pieces, West End musicals, 16th century folk songs, Italian opera and modern contemporary pieces.

They say you get out of something what you put in and never is this more true than when you sing with a male voice choir. So for all you would-be singers singing in the shower at home, or all those former choirboys who would like to re-live those bygone years, come along and try us out. You will never regret it, and don’t be like me who lived in the musical wilderness for 15 years and wishes he had found the Wessex family so many years before!

AH

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The Wessex Male Choir is based in Swindon and currently has vacancies.  If you are interested in finding out more, or coming along to a rehearsal to find out what it’s like, then please visit our website for further information.  We meet on Tuesday evenings from 7.30pm-9.30pm.   See www.wessexmalechoir.uk

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Best Kept Secret….

Why singing in a good choir should be your New Year resolution!

Even if you’re reading this after 1st January, it’s still not too late to make 2018 the year you unlock your potential as a singer and have more fun than going to the gym or giving up beer, chips, or chocolate!

Singing in a choir is one of life’s best-kept secrets.  Here are seven reasons why you should give it a try:

No.1.   It’s Fun!

Like anything that is worth doing, it does require some effort, but the undeniable truth about singing is that it is fun.   Lots of people sing when they are happy, but guess what? It works the other way round too: singing makes you happy!  There’s some science behind it too, because studies have shown that singing in a group releases endorphins (which are the body’s natural ‘highs’).   There’s also plenty of evidence from those who regularly sing in a choir.  During rehearsal they concentrate on singing and, at least for a while, all the troubles and pressures of everyday life are left behind.   Many choristers leave rehearsals feeling happy and satisfied.  And quite a few go directly to the pub for a drink with fellow choristers afterwards!

No.2.   It’s really good for your health.

Singing improves circulation and is great for your heart, lungs, and brain function: it improves your memory and strengthens your mental health too.  It can also benefit your posture and may help you get a better night’s sleep: in some people, it has also helped to reduce snoring.  You might think these are pretty outrageous claims, but there is an ever-growing body of evidence which proves them to be true.  For example a Frankfurt University Study found that “Choir singing positively influences both emotional affect and immune competence.”  But don’t take my word for it: there are links to a number of great articles at the bottom of the page, which should give you all the evidence you need!

NeuroscienceSingingFeature

Graphic courtesy of Uplift Connect (see their article on the Neuroscience of Singing)

No.3.   It improves your social life. Singing in a good choir is a great way of making new friends.  In a choir like the Wessex Male Choir, there are choristers of all ages and backgrounds.  The Wessex also prides itself on being a very friendly and supportive choir who sing to a high standard yet still enjoy a drink or two and some informal singing in the pub after rehearsals or concerts!  The guys are a fun bunch of folk who take their singing seriously, but themselves less so.   In any choir, you become part of a large family – in fact several former rugby players have described belonging to the choir as being a bit like belonging to a rugby club but without the rugby and the injuries!

No. 4.   It helps you to develop new skills.

If you haven’t sung before, then before you know it, you’ll be developing new skills as well as new friends.   Even if you don’t read music, very soon, at least some of it will make more sense.  The Wessex Male Choir has a chorister development programme and a ‘buddy’ system that helps you to develop your singing skills.   The Wessex also has a range of excellent online learning aids available for members for all of the songs we sing. The more you sing, the more you begin to appreciate good choral music and good singers.   You become more knowledgeable about singing in general!

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Members of the Wessex Male Choir enjoying a recent rehearsal.

No.5.   It improves your confidence.

Joining a choir, and eventually going on to perform as part of the group in front of a live audience, really helps build self-confidence.   You don’t have to do solos if you don’t want to, and you will only be put on stage when you’re ready, so there’s no chance of making a fool of yourself.

No.6.   It is a great way of supporting charities.

Every year, choirs like the Wessex perform at concerts in support of great national and local causes.  In October alone, we raised over £3000 for charitable causes.   Some choristers are even participating in the London Half Marathon in March (fast walking and stopping to sing to the crowds on the way around) whilst at the same time raising money for Parkinson’s UK.

No.7.   It gives you a real sense of achievement.

Once you’ve learnt the songs and sung in a concert, you get the most amazing sense of achievement.   It’s no accident that after most concerts, members of the Wessex Male Choir (like many other choirs)  have something called an ‘Afterglow’ – an often impromptu party in a local hostelry where there’s yet more singing and sampling of ale!  You really do get a wonderful feeling of satisfaction after a good concert.  And when you get to the end of 2018 and look back at what you have achieved, I can guarantee that if you joined a choir during the year, then singing will be one of the highlights of the year…every year from now on!

How to Get Involved

For men, the Wessex Male Choir has got an open-rehearsal on Tuesday 16th January from 7.30pm-9.30pm at our rehearsal venue at the Church of Christ the Servant, Abbey Meads, Swindon, SN25 4YX (Map).  The repertoire is very varied: everything from rock and pop anthems to music theatre, opera choruses, traditional songs and well-known choral pieces.  There’s plenty of free parking outside, and if you fancy a pint afterwards, the pub is right next door!  You will be assured of a very warm welcome whatever your age or experience, so why not come along and see what it’s like?  There’s no obligation, and the evening is free!

The Wessex Male Choir is also planning a day-long singing workshop on Saturday 28thApril from 9.30am-4.30pm, also at Abbey Meads, with the inspirational choral director, Mark Burstow.  Again there’s no charge for the day, and as places are limited, e-mail the Choir early at Wessexmalechoir@gmail.com to reserve a place!

The Wessex standard of singing is high (we are one of the UK’s premier male choirs!) so if that isn’t for you, then there are plenty of community singing groups and other choirs in Swindon.   And if you already sing in a community singing group, you can always join the Wessex as well for a bit of variety (quite a few of our choristers sing with other groups as well – the two are not mutually exclusive!)

Articles about the benefits of singing in a choir.

Does Singing Make You Happy? https://science.howstuffworks.com/life/inside-the-mind/emotions/singing-happy.htm

Singing Changes Your Brain (Group singing has been scientifically proven to lower stress, relieve anxiety, and elevate endorphins) http://ideas.time.com/2013/08/16/singing-changes-your-brain/

Community Singing ‘improves mental health and helps recovery’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-42431430

Can Singing in a Choir Make Me Healthier?  http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zcc7tyc

The Effects of Choir Singing… on Immunoglobulin A, Cortisol, and Emotional State. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15669447

11 Surprising Health Benefits of Singing https://takelessons.com/blog/health-benefits-of-singing

The Neuroscience of Singing (The neuroscience of singing shows that when we sing our neurotransmitters connect in new and different ways. It fires up the right temporal lobe of our brain, releasing endorphins that make us smarter, healthier, happier and more creative. When we sing with other people this effect is amplified.) http://upliftconnect.com/neuroscience-of-singing/

GE

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