Busy as a busy thing….

Well first of all, I apologize for the long break in transmission. I’d like to tell you that I’ve been too busy relaxing on a sun-kissed Caribbean island, sipping margaritas and as a result, completely forgot about the blog, but sadly, that wouldn’t be true! The truth is altogether more prosaic: what with our Summer Concert and last-minute challenges getting our new CD ready for the big launch, things were just a bit hectic in the early part of the month and I simply ran out of hours in the day given that I still have to earn a crust or face selling the children for medical experiments.

So first off, let me say a huge ‘thank you’ to everyone who came to hear us in our summer concert at STEAM in sunny Swindon. It was a hugely successful concert even if, with well over 400 in the Great Western Hall on a very warm summer’s day, things got a bit sticky! We were especially delighted to welcome a party of 32 from Cowbridge Male Voice Choir who had traveled up from South Wales to hear us.

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Wessex Male Choir and The Magnificent AK47 join forces for ‘Byker Hill’

One of the discussion points after every concert, seems to be that of repertoire selection (and ‘Afterglow’ food – but’s that’s another thing altogether!), and this year’s summer concert was no exception. Earlier in the year, we had decided we had to focus on competition preparation and raising performance standards as well as preparing songs to a high standard ahead of recording our long, long overdue new CD. As with any period of competition preparation, it meant that we were not able to spend as much time learning new, funky repertoire as we would have liked. So perhaps not surprisingly, we did get a few comments about the comparative lack of light-hearted songs (especially in our first set) at the summer concert, and it’s something we’ll be addressing with a significant number of new, lighter songs which we start learning from September. But we also had lots of fabulous feedback from audience members including one long-standing supporter who told us that this year’s concert was our ‘best ever’ – which just goes to show how difficult it can be trying to keep all audience members happy when people want different things.   As Abraham Lincoln once said, ‘…you can’t please all of the people all of the time’.

Early in the planning stages for the summer concert, we realized that we were unlikely to have many ‘humorous’ items in the programme, so we looked for a guest act that would provide the additional entertainment and humour needed.   We briefly considered a troupe of itinerant ferret-jugglers, but eventually opted instead for a somewhat anarchic men’s singing group from ‘north, north Wiltshire’ (The Magnificent AK47) who we knew would deliver the fun element needed for a well-balanced concert overall. Of course, some folk were disappointed that Wessex didn’t get into humorous mode, especially as quite a few of our choristers and audience members fondly recall such classics as Rob Elliott’s arrangement of El Capotin. It would be fun to do that again, although I’m not sure in these days of ‘offence avoidance’ and accusations of ‘cultural appropriation and stereotyping’ whether donning sombreros, gluing-on unfeasibly large droopy moustaches, and pretending to be Mexicans would be acceptable. I also recall another humorous song from our past – Les Gendarmes – for which our choristers were required to don plastic police helmets and carry squeaky truncheons. Unfortunately the excitement invariably proved too much for some and all too often, words and notes were forgotten amidst the deafening sound of squeaking truncheons. ­So we will have to choose our humorous numbers carefully!

Another comment from one ‘punter’ about the summer concert was that he was unimpressed because didn’t know any of the songs in our first set, which is a rather disappointing thing to hear when, as a Choir, we aim to innovate and introduce new material to audiences (alongside some old favourites, of course). I wonder how on earth some people ever find any songs they like if their minds are closed to new repertoire! It’s also true to say that a lot of the male choirs that have died out in recent years ‘played it safe’ and stuck defiantly to the traditional favourites until their dying breath!

Anyway, our audience numbers are creeping slowly upwards and will one day exceed the large and excited crowd who, a few years back, breathlessly anticipated our opening number having been coaxed into attendance by a badly-spelled promoter’s poster that billed us as the ‘Wee Sex Ale Choir’. Back in the real world, some useful audience polling revealed that although a significant number of audience members hear about our concerts via word-of-mouth from our choristers, there is an increasing number of people who are coming to our concerts who have no connection to choristers. If you discount the possibility that they wondered into the concert by accident, that’s a really healthy sign, especially as we think we are close to the maximum number we can expect from ‘chorister ticket sales’ efforts alone! Other than press-ganging people from the streets of Swindon, the two most successful ways of reaching new audiences appear to be either via our mailing list or via Facebook, and while both are only showing modest numbers at present, both approaches have the capacity to grow significantly!

The other big event for us was the launch of our first new album in over seven years. Called ‘Memory’ (no-one can remember why), we’re pretty pleased with it and initial sales have been very encouraging. (We still have plenty left, so if you would like a copy, please order one via our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk) It’s an eclectic mix of new and old and genres as diverse as pop, opera, music theatre and some traditional male choir favourites.

 

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A week after our own summer concert, a few of us travelled to Cowbridge to hear their concert, which was a lovely event and featured some wonderful soloists as well as some rousingly good singing by Cowbridge MVC under their strangely familiar Musical Director, Rhiannon Williams.   A few of us reflected that in terms of sponsorship and audiences, Cowbridge is very well supported – perhaps because the male choral tradition is still very much stronger in Wales than in England. It’s a sad state of affairs that we struggle to get even small amounts of sponsorship for the Wessex and I can’t help but feel it reflects poorly on Swindon businesses and their interest in supporting the arts. So if you’re a local business based in or near Swindon and want to ‘do your bit’, then please get in touch via our website!

That’s all for now!

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Keeping Your Choristers Happy!

Looking back over some of the previous blogs on here, it seems that the focus has often been on how to recruit new members.   We often overlook our most valuable assets – the members we already have! So in a round-about way, this blog is about retaining people, and how to avoid some of the obvious pitfalls.  For various reasons, I had my grumpy head on when I first published this blog.   Since then I’ve re-read it and realized it was pants, so I’ve revised it.  It’s still pants, but at least it’s not so whingey!

I guess choir politics are pretty much the same whichever choir you belong to and without doubt, in a male choir, egos are never very far from the surface.   Personally, all I’m really interested in is the singing, and making that as good as it can be, but inevitably, if you’re passionate about something, you end up disagreeing with others, and this can become a source of disharmony in the choir if you let it.  Compromise and good communication can prevent choristers feeling that their contributions don’t count.  Most of us try very hard to subjugate our personal agendas to ‘the greater good’, (I can never say that without thinking about Hot Fuzz!) but I doubt that anyone ever really succeeds in doing so, despite the best of intentions.  Having an agreed Choir Vision that everyone can buy into is a good idea and takes away some of the guesswork! Be tolerant with others and remember, all of us think we’re better than we really are. For example, I think I can sing.

Lesson 1: No matter how good you think you are, a little humility and compromise never hurt anyone.

I was left ‘spitting feathers’ a few weeks back when someone quite brazenly claimed credit for something that I had done. Deep breath. Count to three, and move on.  Some people are just like that and most of your colleagues will see it for what it is.  I’ve noticed quite often in the past, that members can be quite critical of committee members, often without really understanding the at times difficult decisions that need to be made. I suppose that if you stand for the committee, you open yourself up to all manner of criticisms (mostly behind your back) and it goes with the territory.  If you’re in that privileged position, try to find the time to tell people informally about what the committee is doing for the Choir.  I’m not sure that posting your committee meeting minutes on the noticeboard really cuts it!

Lesson 2:  Treat everyone fairly and recognize their contributions, no matter how small.  If you’re on the committee, make a real effort to talk to members about what the committee is trying to achieve – and don’t be afraid to elicit opinions.  If you’re not on the committee, cut them some slack – they are trying their best and deserve encouragement. Of course, if you think you can do better, then put your money where your mouth is! In short, communicate, give credit where it’s due and don’t take credit for the work of others.

It’s funny how things tend to come in threes, shortly after having someone take credit for my work, and with just four days to go before a long-planned singing workshop, the visiting workshop leader pulled out due to ill-health.   I like a challenge, but that was a bit of stress I could have done without! Thankfully, my old friend, the amazing Dr Rebecca Berkley, stepped in to fill the void and delivered a superb workshop which I think made a positive and lasting impression on all who attended. (To be clear, when I say ‘old’ friend, I don’t mean she’s old – just that she was MD at Kennet Opera a few years back when I had the privilege of singing the role of MacDuff in Verdi’s Macbeth under her musical direction!) Fair to say, the workshop, which had been sponsored by One-Stop through their ‘Carriers for Causes’ scheme, was a great success, not least because we learnt a new round all about Gin and Tonic!

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Dr Rebecca Berkley leading the workshop astray with thoughts of Gin and Tonic!

No sooner had the dust settled on the workshop, than I received an e-mail from the local performing arts academy in Swindon where we had booked the auditorium for a weekend of recording work, only to be told (with a just a month’s notice), that they were cancelling the booking. I suppose I should be grateful it was a month’s notice and not just a week! However trying to find a good alternative location with the right acoustic and facilities at short notice isn’t a heap of laughs, and as the recording company deposit had already been paid and diaries cleared, changing the date wasn’t an option. Thankfully, one of our committee, Stuart,  for solved the problem (thank you Stu!) and found a location almost on his own doorstep!  The point is that it pays to build networks and tap into the your choir’s ‘collective knowledge’, whether it’s for a last-minute replacement for a workshop or a replacement venue!

Lesson 3: Many heads are better than one when it comes to problem-solving. Your members are your best asset – tap into their knowledge and connections. Do you even know what they all do, what skills they have, or who they know that might be able to help the choir?  Keep them all involved.  Team-working strengthens the sense of belonging.

The passion for singing is what keeps us coming back for more, but sometimes the singing (in my case, my own) doesn’t live up to expectations.  After one rehearsal recently, I found myself feeling unusually low and seriously contemplating my own departure in search of pastures new.  There’s a local singing group I’d love to join, but it meets on the same night as choir, so I can’t do both. It made me think that almost every chorister has something else they could be doing on rehearsal night, and sometimes the pull of the alternative is strongly felt.   I’d been feeling a bit crappy that night anyway, and once I had manned-up, I felt somewhat happier, so for now at least, the Choir will have to put up with me. The moral of the story is, no matter how ‘embedded’ someone seems in the Choir, it doesn’t prevent them having times when they wonder if it’s all worth it. Watch out for the signs and get them back on board quickly!

Lesson 4:  Never assume that your members are happy just because they’re not complaining. Engagement and valuing your members is everything here and the serial whingers whose voices are often loudest, may not be the ones you need to worry about!

One of the many things that makes it all worthwhile is the sweet smell of success. Back in March, the Wessex Male Choir had a particularly successful outing at the Mid-Somerset Festival in Bath where we managed first place in all three of the categories we had entered thanks in no small part to the brilliant leadership of our MD.   Our chamber choir, the Wessex Camerata, also entered a class but, perhaps not surprisingly given our new line-up which is still bedding-in, we only managed a creditable third place against some very good competition. Still it was a good test of the guys’ mettle.   Preparing for the competition was hard work, but as Samuel Goldwyn once said, ‘The harder I work, the luckier I get’ – it’s true both as a choir and on an individual basis.

Wessex MD, Rhiannon Williams, with two out of the three trophies won in Bath.

Lesson 5:  Success and hard work go hand-in-hand. Ensure that everyone understands this – there is no such thing as a free lunch or a short-cut to success! The sooner that choristers understand the connection, the happier they will be about having to work hard. Manage their expectations. No-one said it was going to be easy!

With preparations now well underway for the Cheltenham Festival of Performing Arts later this month, it would be easy to overlook some of the other great things we are doing this year. We’ll be recording our latest CD next month and, as well as a few well-known numbers to keep our traditionalist fans happy, the CD will be packed with new material and different genres. (Follow us on Facebook to hear about the launch of the CD and a special offer on pre-orders!) .

We’ve also received the first draft of a new song of Remembrance that we commissioned from the acclaimed British composer, Paul Mealor. Paul is unique in having held top chart positions in both the pop charts and classical charts simultaneously, and will be known to many as the composer of the Military Wives’ Choir hits Wherever You Are and in My Dreams.   The commission (supported in part by a Co-Op grant), is for male choir but with an optional descant, suitable for a school choir (our way of involving youngsters in remembering the fallen). We asked Paul to use some of the text from Laurence Binyon’s poem ‘For the Fallen’, which includes the well-known stanza that begins ‘They shall grow not old as we that are left grow old…’ and he has done a fabulous job.   All we need now is a good local school choir to help us perform the premiere at a big RBL event in October this year! Also in October, we’ll be performing in the Sheriff of Wiltshire’s event, An Uncelebrated Journey, a showcase for the best of Swindon talent.

We’re very much looking forward to our annual summer concert at STEAM in Swindon again this year (14th July) where our guests will be ‘The Magnificent AK47’ – an anarchic group of singing land-pirates and DIY-ers who are single-handedly changing perceptions about men’s singing. They wear hats, have far too much facial hair, and sing rousing stuff in a manly manner. We’re sure that our Swindon audience will love them! We’re especially looking forward to doing a few joint numbers with them including a rendition of the old English drinking song, ‘Down Among the Deadmen’.

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Brothers in song… Magnificent Wessex choristers with members of the Magnificent AK47!

Lesson 6:  Acentuate the positive! We have an interesting and varied selection of events and activities to look forward to – something for everyone. The promise of the next big gig or special event is often enough to keep people’s enthusiasm flowing!

Okay, I’m mad about singing and over the years, I’ve been lucky enough to benefit from hundreds (or maybe thousands) of hours of singing tuition from some outstanding singers (including Ros Plowright, Stuart Burrows, Ryland Davies, James Gilchrist, Gail Pearson, Susan McCulloch, Patricia Wheatley-O’Neill, Adrian Thompson and many more).   I’ve done masterclasses, consultations, summer schools, and more grade exams than I care to remember, all in the interest of improving my singing (especially as a soloist) and being the best I can be, given that I’ll never be more than a keen amateur. My poor family have been driven nearly insane.  I didn’t really start singing until twelve years ago and I’d like to think it’s never too late to learn new tricks, even for an old dog like me.  One thing is certain, we never stop learning.   So encourage choristers to learn, to attend workshops, to take lessons, to learn how to read music, to rise to musical challenges.  Making development opportunities available to choristers is a good way of keeping the challenge fresh and choristers engaged. The sense of accomplishment and recognition that comes with developing or learning new skills will keep your choristers happy!  As well as having a chorister development programme in the Wessex, our chamber group (the Wessex Camerata) provides some additional challenges in a cappella singing for those who want to push their boundaries a bit further.

Lesson 7:  Have a chorister development programme and provide plenty of opportunities for choristers to learn and improve. Have a culture that imbues choristers with the desire to do better, and make a point of rewarding those who make the effort.

There are probably many more things you can do to keep your choristers happy, I’ve just picked on a few that areas that represent quick wins.  Being in a really good choir is an incentive all of its own.   Above all, try and keep a sense of humour and make sure that singing is fun – but not at the expense of choir discipline!

GE

Inspirational and Visionary!

A team from the Wessex Male Choir was recently fortunate enough to attend a Male Choir Conference in Peterborough. Now you might think that sounds a bit dull, particularly if your view of male choirs is that they are ‘pale, male, and stale’ – a term we heard quite a few times during the day. But it seems that the Wessex Male Choir has very similar aspirations for male choir singing to those of the inspirational choral director, Will Prideaux, who masterminded the conference. I think it’s fair to say we share a vision of male singing reclaiming its rightful position after years of steady decline. The Wessex, under the expert guidance our music director, Rhiannon Williams, is thankfully one of those choirs prepared to ‘up its game’ and play its part in the renaissance of men’s singing.

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Will Prideaux conducting the Peterborough Male Voice Choir during the conference.  (Photo – Peterborough MVC.)

So much for grand designs, but rebuilding and maybe re-branding a somewhat tarnished and neglected genre is going to involve a lot of hard work, commitment, and tough decisions, and maybe not all choristers are prepared to put their shoulders to the task. As Churchill once said “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat”.   Perhaps that’s too stark a picture though, because as most of us who sing in choirs know, it’s also a matter of great satisfaction and pride when things go right. It is a rewarding and fun experience being in good choir, but we agree with Will: music, singing and choir development must lie at the heart of what we do if we take our singing seriously.

Of course, there are different types of men’s choirs: some are little more than singing social clubs for elderly gentlemen where, in reality, the priorities are very different. I have to say that I saw a male choir recently in concert that left me cringing and wanting to tell other audience members that ‘not all male choirs are like that!’   In that moment, I would not have owned-up to being in a male choir.   (Perhaps they had misread the sarcasm of my earlier blog (The Art of Coarse Choral Singing) and taken it as actual performance advice?)  Undoubtedly the ‘social singers’ have their place, but the image and standard of singing they present to the public is most likely one of the reasons for the overall decline in the popularity of male choirs, both in terms of recruiting and audience appeal.

To see just how far male choral singing has fallen, we only have to think about the great composers like Elgar, Schubert and Sibelius (to name but a few) who wrote numerous works for male choirs. The number of contemporary composers writing works for male choirs today is pitifully small, especially in the UK, and is a measure of the degree to which male choral music has lost respect.  We can certainly help ourselves in this respect:  for example, the Wessex Male Choir is commissioning the acclaimed British composer Paul Mealor to write a Remembrance piece for male choir.  But male choirs generally have lost the respect of many other singers.  I know many ‘choral society’ and ‘classical’ singers who look down on male choirs with something approaching disdain, and yet, done well, male choral singing can more than hold its own with more classical genres.

As already mentioned, if we are to reclaim our rightful place, we will have to work hard. We need to adopt a much more professional approach to our music-making – and that includes hiring-in professional music staff, ensuring the focus is on the music, singing, and developing the choir’s skills and competence.   Will mentioned in his keynote address the apparent pride with which a elderly chorister of thirty years’ standing had once told him that he didn’t read a single note of music.   It begs the question, that if someone takes their singing seriously, why on earth wouldn’t they make the effort over a thirty-year period singing with the choir, to develop their skills and learn how to read music? It beggars belief, but I suspect that nearly every male choir has choristers like this and some can perhaps be forgiven if they have never been encouraged to learn, but wearing it like a badge of pride is surely wrong-thinking.  You don’t hear people boasting about being unable to read.   Of course, the Choir itself has a duty to provide the help and training required, and there are many great ways of doing this. Katie Jeffries-Harris of Peterborough Sings, highlighted and demonstrated some of the great technology that can help.   We will certainly be looking at how we might use the Music Prodigy app!  Having a chorister development programme and offering to teach potential choristers new skills is one of the things that attract the right calibre of new recruit.

“If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get get what you’ve always got”

The Wessex Male Choir’s founder and former musical director, Robert T Elliott, an experienced and highly respected choral adjudicator, gave a presentation on competition preparation and what adjudicators look for. With commendable clarity, he spelled out what we should already know. Rather like rugby, you need to do the basics well, and that repeating the same old ‘plays’ (or in this case, the same old stale male repertoire favourites) isn’t going to impress or bring success. A later speaker summed it up well when he quoted the words attributed to Henry Ford when he said “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.”  For male choirs who want to develop, and for whom restoring respect for the male choral genre is important, the message is clear: we need to work hard and innovate, not least in our repertoire selection. For competition success, preparation is key. If you prepare well and allow just the right amount of time, you greatly increase your chances of success. Of course, even then, sometimes the TMO can it wrong though!

Recruiting, as always, was a topic of great interest, and the Peterborough MVC approach is certainly worthy of study. (Visit their website to see the sort of things they do). Quite a few of the ideas can also be found in one of my earlier blogs here. Claire Hailey of Peterborough Sings shared her experiences of project-based recruiting and the many good ideas it encompasses.   Whilst incredibly envious of Peterborough’s recruiting budget, I also reflected that Wessex Male Choir’s ‘Project RMS’ (Real Men Sing) from just over a year ago, employed many of the same methods and produced some excellent results at a fraction of the cost.   However, we will certainly be ‘tweaking’ our future campaigns to incorporate some of the ideas picked up at the conference! When you see the average age of Peterborough MVC members, it’s clear the organization is getting it right.

At the start of the day, we were treated to a recent recording of a once undeniably great choir singing a well-known song – a staple of the MVC repertoire, particularly in the Land of Song. It was pretty rough and ready, and certainly nowhere near the standard historically achieved by this once proud choir. (Which reminds me – be careful about the performances you permit to be posted online).  Despite a fairly depressing analysis of the state of male choir singing today, speaker after speaker shared ideas and provoked thoughts about how good choirs could raise their game. At the end of the day, Will and the Peterborough Male Voice Choir treated us to a demonstration of some rehearsal techniques and sang some new repertoire by way of example.   The singing was excellent and finished the day on a high note, having given us all more food-for-thought, and some very clear ideas about what sort of choir we wanted to belong to. At the end of day which started with such a dismal ‘report card’ about male choir performance and standards today, I think everyone was enthused, raring to go, eager to start making some of the changes, and committing to the hard but satisfying work needed to reclaim the great tradition of male choral singing. Bring it on!

Many thanks to Will Prideaux, Peterborough Male Voice Choir, members of Peterborough Sings, and the guest speakers for making this conference such a great and inspiring event.

 

‘Tis (nearly) the season to be jolly!

Everyone loves Christmas and the Wessex Male Choir is no exception. Christmas trees, lights, presents, old films, presents, chocolates, presents, ugly Christmas jumpers, presents and of course, carols.

Most of us have grown up with fond memories of participating in school nativity plays and singing carols. Now, whilst we no longer get the chance to wear tea towels on our heads or pretend to be donkeys, cows and assorted animals in the manger, we can still sing carols – and occasionally wear silly hats….

Holyrood 2015 (17 of 20)

Let’s be honest, whilst presents are very important, nothing touches the soul like singing. Its ability to move you, to enchant, to captivate and to inspire is a gift like no other. Carols especially evoke the deepest, fondest memories, and if I hear Silent Night sung on Christmas Eve, I still surreptitiously steal a glance at the sky in case I can see Santa’s sleigh.

Christmas is a busy time for us and we eagerly look forward to preparing new concert material – usually beginning in late September. We are a fairly youthful choir, which has its advantages and disadvantages. For example, we are proud to have a blend and tone which is the envy of many of other choirs, allied with an appetite for taking on challenging new arrangements. However, as a young choir, many of us still work and have young families, which means that we are unable to fulfil each of the many requests we receive to perform at Christmas concerts. Our Christmas concerts are therefore relatively exclusive and this year, we are participating in just three events: with the Brize Norton Military Wives Choir at Carterton on the 15 December in aid of SSAFA: our own annual Wessex Christmas concert at the Multi Entertainment Cultural Arena (MECA) in Swindon on Thursday 21st December, and performing a set or two at the Swindon Wildcats game at the Link on the 9th December.

WMC Christmas 2017

Our festive repertoire for this year embraces sacred, traditional, and even Jewish pieces, so there is something for everyone! We have a blend of new pieces, and some old favourites, so if you want to listen to some beautiful new music and sing along with us too, our Christmas concerts are the place to be. Our course, there will be the opportunity to sing along to some of your favourite carols too.

Our concert programme includes:

The Gloucestershire Wassail (also known as the Cricklade Wassail), which has been specially arranged for the Choir by one of our choristers – Guy Edwards: Guy’s arrangement celebrates the traditional & cheerful Wassail whilst bringing a contemporary element, which will thrill all.

The vivacious “Hanukkah holiday” – a guaranteed crowd pleaser, accompanied by some lively “choralography:” Don’t forget your dreidels!

A rarely heard version of The First Noel which combines the traditional carol tune with the baroque favourite, Pachelbel’s Canon in D. This clever arrangement by Michael Clawson intertwines these two timeless works beautifully. It has been pronounced “a first-rate choral masterpiece, which has rapidly become a classic.” It features a three-hand piano accompaniment, but unless we can find a mutant accompanist; two hands will have to suffice.

We Three Kings was originally written by John Hopkins in 1857. Given its enduring its place in the canon of great tunes, I expect John was Welsh! We though, are singing an arrangement by Andy Beck, which has been described as..: “A dramatic choral introduction precedes a sizzling jazz waltz arranged with fresh contemporary chords, driving rhythmic intensity, and original, school-appropriate lyrics. Enjoy the new “star of wonder” melody, paired with an awesome descending chromatic line, and rejoice in the easy-on-the-voice, impressive-on-the-ears jazzy twists!” Beautiful. And that’s just the description!

And Can it Be is a Christian hymn originally written by Charles Wesley in the early 18th century to celebrate his conversion. The original tune was written in a traditional Methodist style similar to those written by his elder brother John Wesley. Dan Forrest has arranged a stunning contemporary interpretation of the tune containing subtle quotes from the original.

The Wessex Camerata (our chamber group) will be performing the beautiful Es Ist Ein Rose Entsprungen, a beautiful old German carol, traditionally associated with the start of Christmas and evoking the wonder and hope of Christ’s birth as prophesied by Isaiah.

PUK Christmas 2015 (13 of 16)

The Wessex Camerata will also be singing an arrangement by Ruth Schram of Personent Hodie,  a much-loved Christmas carol originally published in 1582 in the Finnish song book Piae Cantiones.

As Dylan Thomas wrote in from his poem A Child’s Christmas in Wales:

‘One Christmas was so much like another, in those years around the sea-town corner now and out of all sound except the distant speaking of the voices I sometimes hear a moment before sleep, that I can never remember whether it snowed for six days and six nights when I was twelve or whether it snowed for twelve days and twelve nights when I was six.’

If Christmas holds fond memories for you too, come and celebrate them with us.

-DL.

You can order tickets online now from www.ticketsource.co.uk/wessex-male-choir

Great Venue, Lovely Singing!

Well, the first concert of our new season seemed to go pretty well. Wessex put on a good show in aid of the Royal British Legion in the Baptist Church in Cirencester last Saturday.   This was also Tom Graff’s debut with us as our new principal accompanist and he played a fiendishly tricky solo piece to mark the occasion.

Cirencester Gig

Performing at Cirencester on 7th October 2017.   Photo by Shellon Islip.

This was our first concert in Cirencester Baptist Church and we have to say, it’s very impressive, seating over 500 when full. The £3.7m building was only completed in December 2016 and boasts a superb range of facilities. The acoustic is a bit dry for unamplified singing (lots of carpet, sound-absorbing ceiling tiles, and comfy fabric-covered seating which is a far cry from some of the bum-numbing pews we’ve encountered in other places) but nevertheless, the sound of singing certainly filled the space.

As the concert was marking the launch of this year’s Poppy Appeal locally, there were several Remembrance Songs in the programme. The first of these was Blades of Grass & Pure White Stones – always a powerful reminder of the sacrifices made by so many, and this was followed by the Wessex Male Choir’s chamber group, the Wessex Camerata, performing Only Remembered, in a lovely arrangement made popular by the folk trio, Coope, Boyes & Simpson. During the song, images from World War 1 were projected above the singers, and as the final notes died away like fading memories, the last picture dissolved into a scene of sunlit poppies. The first half concluded with Giorgio Susana’s hauntingly beautiful Io Resto Qui, Addio!, a song that conveys the dying thoughts of an Italian soldier on the Russian Front in World War 2. The Italians fought against a numerically and technically superior Russian force and also suffered terrible loses as a result of the harsh Russian winter. The words of farewell, from a dying soldier, far from his beloved homeland, were also accompanied by black and white images of the Russian Front. The last song of Remembrance, the highly emotional Tell My Father, was performed by Guy Edwards, one of the Choir’s soloists, accompanied on piano by the Choir’s Musical Director, Rhiannon Williams-Hale.   It’s fair to say that quite a few hankies were needed after that.

The concert wasn’t all focused on Remembrance though. There were many upbeat numbers too, such as the lively arrangement of El Fusilado (complete with maracas and shaker), and the inspirational What Would I Do Without My Music?  The Choir also showed off some of it choreographed moves in the ever-popular Chattanooga Choo-Choo.

Originally, the evening had been planned as a joint concert with a Welsh choir, but unfortunately they had to pull-out. So as not to disappoint the audience though, the evening had a strong Welsh flavour. Despite the Wessex Male Choir being based firmly in England, we sang two pieces in Welsh, and a fair number of the arrangements were by notable Welshmen such as Alwyn Humphries, Haydn James and Mansel Thomas (and a few less notable ones: Grahame Jones and Guy Edwards – who also happen to be members of the Choir!).

With hardly time to draw breath, we’re now preparing for our next concert in Lechlade on Saturday 14th October at St Lawrence’s Church.  The concert is in aid of the Village Hall fund, which is needed to replace the old village hall that was burnt down by an arsonist.

For more information about the award-winning Wessex Male Choir – including how to join us – please visit www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk.

New term, new challenges!

The Wessex Male Choir is just starting a new exciting season and is looking for good singers!

Well, we’re off to a great start for our 2017/2018 Season, lots of exciting new repertoire, some new members, a new chairman, and a new principal accompanist!  At our first rehearsal we managed a complete sing-through in four-parts of the wonderful ‘And Can It be?’ arranged by Dan Forrest.   What a fabulous piece of music it is.

We’re always keen to hear from men who are interested in singing with the Wessex, and of course we run a number of recruiting events every year.  We kicked off this year with a small group of choristers singing in some of the pubs in Royal Wootton Bassett.  We sang about half a dozen songs in the Five Bells, The Cross Keys, The Crown, and the Angel, before finally heading off to the Ganges Restaurant for a good curry.   We received lots of wonderful feedback from the audiences, and hopefully, some of the men who heard us will try to get along to our rehearsal venue at the Church of Christ the Servant, Abbey Meads, Swindon (SN25 4YX).  We meet every Tuesday evening from 7.30pm-9.30pm and we would be delighted to welcome any chap who wants to find out more about the Choir.   There’s no obligation to join, just come along and listen. chat to us, and join in if you feel like it!  We’re a very sociable bunch, so you can always join us for a beer and chat afterwards in the pub next door if you prefer!

1.jpgSome of the chaps enjoying a song in the Angel, Royal Wootton Bassett, on 2 September, as part of the recruiting drive.

We’re going to be busy in September preparing for our first concert of the season which is at the Methodist Church in Cirencester on Saturday 7th October.   The concert is a fundraiser for the Royal British Legion.  We suffered a bit of a set-back this week because the Welsh Male Voice Choir that should have been coming to take part in the concert has pulled out, but we’ll still have a great programme featuring both the Wessex Male Choir main choir and our very accomplished Chamber Group.  A week after that we’ll be in Lechlade, singing in a concert in aid of the Village Hall Appeal.   Details of both concerts and how to get tickets are available on our website at www.wessexmalechoir.co.uk 

21432770_1152848664848434_4167066721726621310_n.jpgNow is a great time to join the Choir:  we’re learning new songs, so everyone is in the same boat!

We’re very pleased to welcome on board Tom Graff who has started as our new principal accompanist.  We also have a new Chairman, Simon Warren, who has taken over from Guy Edwards (who remains as part of the choir’s management group, but fancied a change of portfolio!).  We’re all looking forward to the new season immensely and know that our brilliant musical director, Rhiannon Williams-Hale, will be working us hard.  Over the summer, we also welcomed renowned British composer and TV & Radio Presenter, Howard Goodall, as our second patron alongside Aled Jones.

If you sing already in a community choir or other singing group, but you’re ready to step up to something more exciting, then please get in touch – we’d love to hear from you!